scrappystickyinkymess

Storytelling quotes to download, and how I made them

2 Comments

Today is the day we all say a final good-bye to our WOYWW friend Shaz Silverwolf. I’m not feeling super creative so nothing very arty today.

I get into the weeds here, and I can’t promise this was the best or most perfect way to accomplish this, but it’s what I did. While I am not 100% happy about the results (that e is wrong!) it’s close enough for now.

The goal: to make quote blocks that looked enough like the Dina Wakely stamp from a set I own that I could use them on the same page.

The stamp looks like this:

Thing to note: It seems slightly stretched in height, the “ink” has a hand lettered quality, or maybe more like an ink-bleed from stamping, and it has scattered grungy dots or ink splatters behind.

The first thing I did was audition a few fonts that I thought were a close (if not exact) match. Surprisingly, Helvetica (yep – bog-standard, everyone has this on their computer Helvetica) was pretty close.

Not even close, you say? Well, by manipulating the shape of the letters, and a few key letters in particular:

I got to the point (by both stretching the letters height-wise and squashing them together width-wise) where you can see the match is not that far off:

The shape of both the b and the e are not quite right but not a million miles off. The program I use is a weird one. In order to add the grungy, handwritten feel to the letters I would need Photoshop or the Gimp or something like that, and I just was not SO bothered by the slight miss-match to do that. I might continue playing with this, but no reason not to share what I have at the moment. By dupicating the block of text that fit, then typing the quotes, each quote matches the spacing and sizing. Adding the grunge was tedious but not hard – I already had a font, one I have used often, that has grungy dots as part of it – SC_InkBlots (used on my Stampotique book) – so all I had to do was repeat the 7, flipping and rotating and resizing it to offer some variation, and hid those variation behind the text. Again, if I had Photoshop, and an ink-spatter brush it would be 100x easier.

The end result is not bad, and useful for any art journalers, whether they have this particular stamp or not.

Because the quotes themselves are useful, I did a PDF with both the ink-spattered version and a plain version. Feel free to download and print it for use in your art journal. Do bear in mind that your printer ink might smear if you use any wet medium over it – mine did a bit cause I was too lazy to get out my gel plate and seal it. I’ll just add the page again so you can see my first version of this process, although the PDF versions are, I think, a closer match – the ones on the page needed to be squished a little bit more.

It’s been a while since I shared a download like this. I hope it is useful and if so, I might do more.

Almost forgot my next 100 days page! Photographed before the journaling. Intentionally.

Off now to explore my program and see if there is a tool in it to rough up that font a bit, and to photograph my junk-journal pages….

2 thoughts on “Storytelling quotes to download, and how I made them

  1. I have saved your hard work, and hopefully I will be able to use them! Thanks so much for your generosity! Have a great rest of your week, thanks for your visit, Lindart #31

  2. Interesting play with fonts….
    Thank you for the words, will be useful for my ATCs.

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