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2020 to 2022 calendar Onesheets

Another something I get asked for a lot.  These are vertical Onesheets.  You can print them at any size by selecting the paper size in your printer dialog box.  You can print them at A3 or US legal for a wall calendar of a slightly larger size.  You can print them as a 4×6 for Project Life or a scrapbook page (although the print is going to be pretty tiny!) or standard US letter or A4 for a 3-ring/2-ring/4-ring binder style planner. Remember, you can change your print option to 2-per-page and get a Filofax sized planner sheet.

You will get two of each year, but I’m sure you can find a use for the second copy!

Here are the three versions:

This one has been posted before. If you want 2019 included in one PDF, this is the one for you.

 

This pretty cherry blossom one is also available for 2019, bundled with 2018, but you can just print the one page but the 2020-2022 bundle is HERE.

And here is a totally new one.  I still love the North Point font – maybe by 2022 it’ll be trendy again! Get that bundle HERE.

Of course you can grab all of them and print one year from one, the next year from the next, etc.

I might rotate them so people you have a planer in the horizontal orientation can also use them, but it might take me a little while to get to it.


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2020 Pretty Circle CD, checked and rechecked!

This pretty CD circle calendar is always a top request.  I really wanted to update the design a little but as time has been short and life busy, I’ve opted to just leave it as is and update the months.  Reminder – 2020 is a leap year!

 

You can grab the PDF here:

A word about errors:  I have mentioned my weird little program for making calendars. I have mentioned it is a little bit buggy.  Even so I do really like it, I know it, and I can usually make it do what I want it to for less than the cost of a couple of months of Adobe.  But it does keep me on my toes.  I must remember to check and recheck, because, very occasionally, something will alter, almost on it’s own.  The usual thing is something will all of a sudden not be BOLD when converting to a PDF. Or maybe a line defining a box will be different across 6 boxes on a page.  Because I create date columns (not individual date numbers) why all of a sudden ONE number would just not be there, I have no idea.  I have used this font and those blocks 100s of times.  January always shows 31 days.  Not yesterday.  The 2020 Tear-off set is fixed now.  Sorry to anyone who downloaded the faulty tear-offs.  I hope you notice and come back to get the corrected ones. My resolve has been strengthened and

 


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More calendars (tear-offs and Spanish Do to Sá) as requested!

I have 100s of files for calendars that I have made in the past.  When I get a request, SOMETIMES it is as simple as changing the month blocks to reflect the different date arrangements.  SOMETIMES even that is a lot of work.  These were neither simple nor too much work that I couldn’t be bothered. They fell nicely into the just enough effort to be interesting, without being annoying category.

What I hate, is changing from a Sunday to Monday to a Monday to Sunday arrangement. I really hate doing that.  Although, to be fair, I have worked out methods that make is way less effort that it once was.  Still, I’m not a fan.

Luckily one request, for a Spanish language version of the Doily cards, was from Nubia in Uruguay. Unlike many Spanish-speaking countries (or some Spanish-speaking USA residents) she does NOT need a Monday to Sunday version. You can get it here.

Another request, From Carol, for tear-off blocks that are not so girly, was also, fairly easy to complete. And I notice an error! It’ll be back tomorrow corrected!

My program is so buggy.  I tried fixing the missing day about 3 times and every time I looked at the final PDF 31 January was gone.  I can only hope when I add it back in it “stuck!”

Phew! There is is! And here is the PDF


Little things like the small 29 days for February 2020 (a leap year) is the kind of thing I can easily miss when altering an older calendar, and checking and re-checking for hat sort of thing takes TIME.  In this case, the exact version she wanted was so buried in the folders of calendars it was easier to make a new one than find the old one. They might be slightly bigger then the originals, but hopefully still useful.

I still have the Pretty Circle CD calendar that people always ask for to be updated, and some one-sheets (although there are a few 2020-2021 one-sheets already available here and here) and people do request landscape onesheets for use in their planners, so I expect you might see more from me sometime soon.


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Doily Calendar cards for 2020-2022

Hello!

 

We spend a lovely few weeks back in the USA, a trip that was long overdue.  But I got a fair few requests that I have been working my way thru.  This is one of them.

A before I give you the goodies, just a small request.  If you comment on my blog to ask for a calendar to be update to the current (or an upcoming) year, PLEASE either be sure you are commenting on the post that contains the calendar you want OR that your comment includes a link to that calendar.  Not meaning to point fingers but I make a ton of calendars.  And saying “the doily one” (which has maybe 5 or 6 different versions) or “the round one” (also 5 or more versions) or some other defining characteristic that means something to YOU but not to ME is going to mean the request drops way down to the bottom of my list! I have at least two requests for mystery calendars. They will remain in the queue till I get more info.

Ronna gets it right every year.  So I have done three years for her! Here are the Doily, re-oriented calendars for 2020, 2021 and 2022.

As usual, I tend to slightly alter the fonts and some other small details, just enough so I don’t get bored recreating the identical calendars year after year. Here is a page from each so you can see the slight variations. 

2020 is a leap year, and as usual I did my best to check, re-check and double check the dates to make sure it is right, but if you have been here in the past to get a calendar you know no one is infallible, not even calendars uploaded to other sites.  And you may recall me showing the link to a calendar I used for verification that was totally wrong, and so was mine.  I feel pretty confident I got it right this time, but as ever be on the lookout for any errors. If you find one let me know. 😀

 


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It’s all about the knitting at the moment

I know I have been totally MIA here for a loooooonnnggg time.  Life has been pretty full.  The crafting I am doing is pretty much limited to knitting – something I can do in the car, in waiting rooms, while catching up on my endless film queues etc. I will also say the knitting is almost 90% socks.

I thought I would just do something I have been thinking of doing for a while, and that is using my blog to document those projects.

I made these a couple of months ago – the wool is from a bag we unearthed from under the table at my local knitting shop (very sadly soon to close) All Ewe Knit is Love in Shaftesbury.

This sock is using the pattern Slip Stitch Lines and is free on Ravelry.

I formed the sock-blocker from a coathanger, using the printable pattern here and the info here.

The heel is as nice a FLK heel as I have ever done.

And I have been experimenting with other versions, like a traditional slip-stitch version

and an Eye of Partridge version!

So that is what has been keeping me busy.  I am still also sending out 10-20 book folding pattern every week and a fair few DASH planners as well.  I may be back soon. But it’ll likely be a knitting post so papercrafters be warned!

 

 


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Still here. A bit about Dementia Dolls…

Settle in. This is a long one.

I am still here, just not up to much blogging.  Still sending out book folding templates, still knitting, not scrapbooking or doing much papercraft at all really.  Spent a day in A&E After Maddie shoved a pitchfork right thru her foot at the garden centre of her college. Fun.

But for my little bit of social interaction I pop over to the local Library every Friday morning for a couple of hours.  Mostly I knit there, and chat.  Jack is coming over from LA for a visit and he wants socks, so I worked out a way to knit 2 pairs of socks at the same time, at first on two circulars and then all four on one, once I no longer had to wrangle the 4 balls of yarn.  No photos, sorry, but I’ll probably do it again.

As part of the craft club, we had a presentation from the local Dementia UK group.  They needed Twiddle Muffs and we made lots of them.  The also showed a large, floppy doll and said that they would like a few of them as well, if anyone was so inclined.  No one really was but I like a challenge so I decided to make one.  The first one was done in the normal way, although I did abandon the complicated and all-in-bits pattern and adapted it to an in-the-round version.  She was sweet, but she’s gone now – again no photo. Again, sorry.

The Dementia lady came back the next week to find me.  She told me a lovely story about a woman in one of the care homes who has never been responsive, or engaged, and who has never spoken, since they have been visiting.  Apparently when she saw the doll she gasped and dashed right for it.  She grabbed it, hugged and cuddled it, then started singing it a lullaby while she rocked it.  She is much more engaged in the … meetings? Sessions, maybe, now that she has the doll.  I was asked very nicely if I could make another.

About this time I had gotten a couple of knitting machines.  Circular ones, that I thought would be helpful for twiddle muff making.

Finally, a photo!

I started with the toy one, then got the proper Addi, and at the same time ordered the Sentro via Amazon, but I suspect from China.  It was cheap, versus the Addi Kingsize (£30 vs £115!) None of them are EASY to use to make flat panels (the Sentro is best) but they all make pretty reasonable tubes. And fast. My plan had been to use up all my scraps of yarn to make the boring inside of the Twiddle Muffs then shift to needles to complete them with special stitches, odd yarn, beads, etc. Here are a few samples of the ones I’ve done.

I have a whole PDF on those which I may share at some point.

But then I thought I could possible use them to make Dementia Dolls if I took a minute to think about it.

These dolls are meant to be quite long-limbed and quite floppy.  I think they are more of a suggestion of a child than a real depiction of one.  Not at ALL like the last doll I made.  Anyone here remember Jasmine?

She was a LOT more complicated.  I am …. doll parts ….

Basically, the dolls are made of five tubes: one tube for the head and body, two for the legs and two for the arms. The head & body is 65 rounds on the 48-stitch machine and the legs are 65 rounds on the 22 stitch machine.  The arms are 28 rounds on the 22 stitch machine.  Sometimes I think more length on the arms would be better but when I have made them longer, 30 or 35 rounds, they look weird.

That yarn is aran weight (equal to worsted in the USA and what the machines like best) and much more beige than the weird grey it seems here.

I gather the top of the head&body tube

Then stuff the head and do a running stitch around to gather again for a neck.  It varies but generally I do between 25 and 30 stitches down from the gather.

I usually do the nose so I don’t lose track of where the face goes while I position the arms and attach the legs! I just build it up with stitches on top of stitches.

The head&body is 48 stitches around and the legs are 22 – that is determined by the machines.  There is some variation in the larger ones (there is a 40 stitch, a couple of 46 stitch ones and this 48) but all the small ones are, I believe, 22 stitches.  To attach the legs in the easiest way possible, I load 11 stitches from each leg tube onto a needle, then load 24 stitches from the front of the body onto another.

I do  a 3-needle bind-off to join those with a neat edge.  I decrease away the extra stitches from the body side by doing one from the leg and two from the body on the last stitch of the first leg and the first stitch of the second

This gives me a nice neat join. Make sure you put a locking stitch marker on the last stitch from your bind off, as you will load that back on the needle when you do the back half join to the back of the legs!

I stuff a little bit of toy stuffing in the bottom of each leg and gather them about 8-10 stitches up, to make a bit of a foot. The SUGGESTION of a foot anyway. Stuffing first means you don’t have to push the stuffing all the way down that long leg.

I load the leftover stitches on to the needles the same, 22 from each leg, 24 from the back of the body.

and slip on that last held stitch where I will start the 3-needle bind-off

This is the tricky part.  Now you have to stuff the legs and the body, pretty full.

It is impossible to get right-sides-together to do the same sort of 3-needle bind-off so I simply do it as you see it.  There is usually a gap where the extra stitches from the body are and that allows you to stuff it a bit more if need be.  The join looks fine for this doll’s purpose.

The arms are made by gathering each end of the arms and folding the tubes lengthwise.  I do a mattress stitch along the edges and stuff the tube lightly.

Sew the arms on and done.  I made this doll in about three hours.  With that kind of speed I can make many more dolls and hopefully help many more people.

I tend to dress them in whatever I have doll-clothes wise or what I can get in the charity shop from the baby clothes section.  3-6 month sizes work best.  I always do a simple face, just half-circle eyes and a half-circle mouth.  Like I said, they only need to be the suggestion of a child. I am experimenting with hair, trying to balance looks against speed.

Well, that is what I have been doing. Oh and I am finally knitting a summer top with some yarn I bought when Jack was a baby, from John Lewis in London.  It came back to me with our shipment of house stuff that had been stored back in the States for decades.  I guess maybe that is why I don’t blog much – my followers really aren’t knitters, primarily, so I feel they might be a bit bored.  If you made it all the way to the end, well done you.

Maybe I’ll be back sooner than my once every month or so schedule.


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My Nearly No-Sew knitted stuffed heart pattern. Again

I have been tweaking this pattern since I first posted it some two years ago.  I think I am happy with a couple of improvements so I am adding it again.

The biggest improvement is a little hack for making smooth KFB.  I have seen it a few times in various places – I think it is abbreviated as KFSB, or Knit Front, Slip Back.

Basically, you knit the front of the stitch then twist and insert your yarn as if you will knit into the back loop

Instead of knitting, you simply slip that loop over to the right needle.

You have still made another “stitch” (see the three loops where once there were two?) but it looks so much better and it is just a bit faster! The resulting increase is also a bit smoother that the usual KFB.

The harsh straight bars that you get with a KFB (and you can see a little trio of them in the smaller heart-tip) are instead a more gentle, angled bar.

I have taught this heart to a few people, and one aspect that occasionally give people trouble is working on the two “heart bumps” so I thought I would redo the photos for that and practice with my new phone’s camera.

Once you have completed the increases and are ready to do the heart bumps:

Knit the first 10 stitches on the front needle. Slip the last 10 stitches onto some scrap yarn – in this case scrap yarn is a better choice than a stitch marker!

It is a lot less likely to get in your way, because now you will knit only the 20 stitches on the right, 10 on the front needle and 10 on the back.

Once you knit to the end of the heart bump section, cut a long tail and thread a big-eye needle. Run the end thru the live stitches but DO NOT GATHER.

This is where you will stuff.

Now, thread the new yarn end onto your needle and (here comes the sewing bit) make a stitch or two to close the gap in the V of the heart.

Secure this so when you begin knitting it doesn’t loosen up. Now, working on the final 20 stitches, knit a round then repeat the instructions for the original heart bump.  If you are struggling to keep the final few stitches from gathering, slip a fat marker into the opening.

Stuff the heart and gently gather the two tops.

Either secure and weave in the ends OR thread each one thru your needle, insert and exit thru the centre V to create a hanger.

I’ve been stuffing them with lavender from our garden!  Did you know lavender repels the clothes moth?  I have spent too much time knitting socks only to sacrifice them to a hungry moth!

Here is the new pattern.  Hope you enjoy it!

 


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2019 One-sheet calendars, Landscape mode

A week or so ago I had a request from Niki, who wanted my one-sheet calendars in landscape rather than portrait/  It sounds like an easy process but it … isn’t.

The originals are here. You can go to that link and grab them if you prefer the portrait versions.  They look like this:

Changing the layout isn’t as easy as just shifting things around.  I recall doing a lot of work creating the chunk of grasses and flowers from the original file of elements.  I didn’t save it as a working file, so the landscape version is not the same. Also, it is not as easy to arrange the 12 month blocks landscape.  Anyway, this is what I came up with:

And as I was doing that one, the other one in the folder was the cherry blossom one.  So I did that landscape as well:

If I’m honest, I prefer the cherry blossoms, which is a surprise, as I prefer the watercolour one in portrait orientation.

Grab the WATERCOLOUR one here

Grab the CHERRY BLOSSOM one here

 

Enjoy!


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Mount for unmounted stamps – my best use for the Creative Palette (and a cheap alternative)

So there is history here.  You might like to go back and read a few previous posts (or not, as you prefer.)

  • My review of the CP v the Gelli plate and where I die cut it with my Sizzix

That last link is full of warnings – press the stamp HARD onto the CP.  Don’t use it in this way if you worry about messing up whatever you are stamping on to. Shake the mount.  Wash the backs. blah blah blah.

I kept finding that, with every use, the CP surface got less and less sticky and washing it was too much of a bother if I had to do it every time I wanted to stamp an unmounted stamp.

I store most of my unmounted stamps like so:

In binders, and then in baseball card sleeves:

I have not ever wanted to go to the expense of mounting all the stamps, and bulking up the binders.  So over the years I have come up with a few different methods that work for me.  Generally, a strip of strong double-sided tape on a clear mount will do the trick.

I bought a bottle of Aileens Tack It (over & over) cause lots of people recommended it as a good way to make the red rubber, unmounted stamps into “cling” stamps.  It works, sure, but then you have to store all these sticky backed stamps. Ah … No.

Fast forward to the post of CP as mount and….an idea!

Yep.

Why this works – first, the CP is just a bit spongy.  Not too spongy, but enough that it acts as both the mount and the cushion and gives a nice image (might have been nice had I actually shown that – sorry, I’m out of practice at blogging) especially when stamping on to my cork-floor-tile-in-a-big-ziplock-bag stamping mat. Second, there is only the couple of CP chunks that are sticky. Easy to store.  I keep a lot of plastic packaging.  This is from a Spellbinders die.  I just flipped the halves so rather than tightly encasing the die, there is a slim open area that fits two of the sticky CP bits.

Perfect fit.

Now, this makes sense for me because I already own a (mostly useless for the kind of monoprinting I like to do) Creative Palette.  But the CP is not widely for sale anymore (or not that I could find) and if you don’t already have one, this is not a good enough reason to go buy one.

As a cheap alternative, I had a go at coating a piece of sticky-backed fun foam with the Tack It.  It worked just fine.

There is a slight issue with the fun foam being quite thin.  When you press to stamp the sticky surface can just grab the paper – I found this to be most problematic with tissue paper, not at all an issue with a paint-coated journal page, for example.  I did not find it as much an issue with the CP-as-mount.

In hunting for my CP package, I unearthed a nice gelli-print, so I can add at least one decent looking image for you LOL!:

Now I must decide what to do with it.

If you have a Creative Palette gathering dust, why not turn it into a set of stamp mounts? If you don’t have one, try the sticky-backed fun foam.  Let me know if it works for you!


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Forgotten calendars – worth adding? 2019-22, Dogs, Cats and Project Life.

In rummaging thru some of my folders of half-forgotten work, stuff I abandoned for one reason or another, I found a few things that I thought MIGHT have an audience. Some of them I updated in my Tall Box calendar style.

I made another set of One-Sheets for 2019 thru to 2022.  They use a similar sketchy design as the cards here.  Links to both the Sunday to Saturday and Monday to Sunday options in that post.

It could either be a plain, simple B&W one OR you could opt to colour it in.  You can download that here.

I also had requests from different people, for a DOG or a CAT calendar.  I always had dogs growing up, never been a cat person at all, but having had more than one person ask about them I figured I might give it a go.  I had found a font that I thought was cute, that had some really quirky little drawings of cats and dogs.  To be honest, for some of them I found it hard to tell which was which! I mean, look at this:

I added the whiskers cause I thought that was what made it look more cat-like.  Flipped it looks more bulldog-like, sort of.  Anyway, I had made the calendars but never added them.  I will.  Comment and tell me what you think. Cat:

 

 

And Dog:

Lastly, I’ve kinda jumped off the Project Life bandwagon.  I used to do a lot of designs for cards, not just calendars, but they seem much less popular at the moment.  As my time (and energy level) is pretty limited, I generally tend to do things I know (or at least think I know) will be useful.  This is a set of calendar cards I made ages ago and never added.

I liked them pretty well, I just didn’t LOVE them.  If YOU like them, grab them here.

I have a few others that I might update (like a little cartoon monster one for kids – thought it would be cute printed BIG for their wall each month) but any thoughts you have feel free to comment them here.