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Some DIY samples (Decorate it Yourself calendars)

OK, well I had hoped I could get all 12 done, but we had a bit of a family day yesterday and I only managed a handful.  Some of them are things I already mentioned.

DIYcalendar

I have a few favourites.  The simple collage on March is one.

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I really like the wrapped baker’s twine with tag for November and the inking+stenciling+stamping on January (even if I worked on it with wet hair from the shower and I smudged a bit of the A.

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and the Washi-tape chaos on April and faux Letterpress with an inked embossing folder on February

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You can just see the MAY, with a chunk of patterned paper filling the gap, there at the back.

The point is it is pretty easy to tie your calendar blocks in with your PL page with not a lot of work.  So go ahead and grab them here and then show me what you do with them……

 


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Creative Palette with pigment ink

I had a further play with the Creative Palette with acrylic paint the other day, and my results, no matter what I tried, were equally disappointing.  I tried a prussian blue chalk ink on it, thinking inks might work, but it stained the circle very BLUE and nothing I did would remove it. I stuffed it in the sleeve and on the shelf and decided that I would waste no more time with it.  I was going to blog all the things I tried but then I thought Why bother? I’ve already said it was an epic FAIL for me and nothing I said was going to expand on that.  But then an odd thing happened – I turned on the TV at just about 6 pm, ready to set up a recording for DD and the TV happened to be on Create & Craft.  Odd, cause I haven’t watched it for DAYS.  In the seconds before it went off the air on Freeview I noticed mention of CREATIVE PALETTE!  I went to the website to watch the show, which had been on at 3 PM, I think, and watched the bit where the guest demoed the CP with Crafter’s Ink re-inkers.  Crafter’s ink is just pigment ink that can be heat set and becomes permanent.

A dim memory surfaced.  I had a handful of little bottles of pigment ink re-inkers that I swear I bought 20 years ago, most of them had never been opened.  I dragged them out and sat down to have a play.

Creativepalettepigment

One thing the guest mentioned was that she brayers on some hand sanitizer first, then adds the pigment ink.  I did do that for the first few ones, but to be honest in the end I mostly skipped that step – the pigment ink stays wet enough without it.

It worked.

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That is a couple of colours, with one of my Gelli Plate anaglypta wallpaper samples pressed in to it then the print pulled.

Very Gelli plate like! But with pigment ink not paint.  Softer, chalkier.  Pretty. But worth the effort?  Maybe.

So then I tried a stamp. In general my success was only with removing the ink on the palette and letting the lighter/white space do the talking:

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This was a big, rubber background stamp. The tone-on-tone look is OK, I just wonder how worth it it is.  Could I get close enough to a similar effect by just stamping?

Foam stamps really remove the ink – not ones that are caked with paint from Gelli play, but fairly clean ones:

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The was probably the last one that I used the hand sanitizer first.  I think that and the too heavy layer of ink muddied the print too much:

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Still it was mildly interesting. A MUCH thiner layer of ink now, but I didn’t clean off the blue.

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I really liked that one.  And this one – more blue over the top, big bubble wrap, and you can still see the foam stamp impression.

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One of my favourites for sure.   Another foam stamp cut from one of the Die Delights.

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I thought I could brayer on the pigment ink from an ink pad, so I did – this is one of those multi-colour strip pads. It is very light, and as the bubble wrap still had wet ink on it I pressed that to the palette to transfer the ink for another layer

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Keeping the brayer in position gave me a rainbow effect when I brayers the ink on.  It is a bit more vibrant than it looks here.

I tried brayering on gome mossy green then stamped over that on the palette with some copper:

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Again, the photo doesn’t do it justice, but why not just brayer the ink onto paper then over-stamp?  The palette really doesn’t ADD anything to the process, except for a slight more…atmospheric look, I guess.

I then HAD to try a stencil.  I still felt that HAND CUT (so much thinner) stencils would give a better impression and they did, but still not what I would call sharp and defined.

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You maybe can see I first ran one of my foam shape rollers over the plate to give it some added interest.  Again, the stencil was loaded with ink so I pressed that onto another earlier attempt that wasn’t brilliant – I think I tried something I thought I heard on the show, which was that hand sanitizer would re-activate the ink.   I brayered it on over some leftover ink after that first, very un-defined foam stamp print and that gave me the background you see here:

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And that one was REALLY cool.

So here is the array:

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Some maybe worth keeping (probably great for ATC backgrounds) but I am still not convinced this is something I am going to do a lot of.   Oh, I just noticed – that single foam stamp towards the right?  Between the blue and bubble one?  Fo THAT one I simply pressed and small pigment ink pad onto the palette.  The pattern of small overlapping squares was neat, and def worth playing with.

Final thoughts on this?

  • if you are using re-inkers keep he application light – small dots of ink scattered across the palette.  Hand sanitizer first will help a think layer cover.  Too much ink produces a blotchy impression
  • removal tools (foam stamps, rubber stamps, textured wallpaper samples, combs, etc) produce the best images
  • you can brayer on or press on an ink pad rather than droplets from re-inkers but you will get a lighter colour.  AND if pressing on use ONE colour or yo will cross contaminate your ink pads.
  • stencils are best f ones yo cut from thin material – so far.  I really need to try a thick one again at some point to be sure.
  • do press whatever you used to REMOVE the ink back onto a print or even onto the ink on the plate.  Those are def. my favourite effects.
  • acrylic paint is CHEAP – I don’t think re-inkers are.

One BIG warning is keep in mind pigment inks dry super slow – that’s their benefit for embossing, for example.  But you have to put the prints aside to completely dry for a LOT longer than you would do with a print from paint on the Gelli plate.

I might try Distress ink at some point, but as the Chalk ink so badly stained my plate (but made NO DIFFERENCE and did NOT transfer to future prints) I’m kinda afraid it might end up brown and opaque at some point if I carry on.  The jury is still out on this, for me.  Except on one point – do NOT buy this thinking it will work anything LIKE a Gelli Plate.  It doesn’t. Well, maybe if you take the added step (and expense) of adding Flow Medium to every application of paint, it might, but I just don’t see the point when a Gelli plate doesn’t need that and works for paint better.

But at this point I can’t say the Creative Palette is a TOTAL FAIL.  That’s as far as I am willing to go at this point LOL!


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Stencil letterpress

I saw this video late one night and fancied having a go, but I have very few wood veneer pieces.  A star from last year’s advent calendar and a couple of trees, I think, and that is about it.

The star worked, although I had the same problem she had with one area impressing too deeply and cracking:

star
 I was looking for other things that might work and decided to try some chipboard.

fauxletterpress

It worked too, although the pigment ink soaked in to the chipboard more than I would have liked on some pieces – and getting the pieces down on the cardstock in any sort of reasonable alignment was tricky,  The pigment ink is so wet and stays wet for so long, even the tiniest dot on a finger tip ends up on the final piece.

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But the emboss is quite deep, which is nice. Also some cracking…not so nice.  I did play around with the idea of coating the chipboard with gel medium to keep the surface from peeling away when you pull it off, but the brush strokes (and even the texture from the brayer, using my Gelli plate-to-coat trick) show.  Maybe the kind of chipboard that has a coating on it would be the best kind for this.

So I have done faux letterpress with embossing folders but the real problem with that is it’s so hard to skim the paint or ink on just the raised bits and not into the open areas.  But as I had the big shout out anyway, and a couple of new stencils, I thought why not try those?

stencilletterpress

Not bad – some darker areas along the lines where the ink was heavier, and the stencil has a border around it, like many stencils do.  I played around with cutting a mask, which helped, but you still get the embossing even if you don’t get the ink:

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I may play around with it a bit more, but the best plan seems to be just to trim it – which makes it less like letterpress!  But overall it looks better.

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Stencils without a border are clearly the best choice for this, but I only have maybe three like that so not ideal.

You can see on the back the emboss is decent – not as deep as the veneer but it doesn’t crack at all.

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Well work further play.  I must go back and watch a few more of her videos – I always liked her work in scrapbook mags and books and her cards are cute, but she seems to have a lot of technique videos.  I am ALWAYS on the look out for them!

Off to make falafel.  Should have bought some while I was out, then I could keep playing…. oh well….

 


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That Black Magic technique, updated

I am always surprised when an old post of mine all of a sudden keeps getting views and pinned, and I get questions that I can’t answer cause it’s been SO LONG since I did the original thing. This post is getting hit hugely. I did that back in 2012 so I hope I can be forgiven for being a little fuzzy on the details LOL!

I decided I should go back and do the technique again and try a few other variations.  Luckily (?) the power was out AGAIN today so I had plenty of time to play.

So let’s begin.

I thought I would try

  • the black acrylic paint
  • Archival ink
  • Memento ink
  • Pigment ink

The process is pretty much the same to begin with, then there are some options.

1. ALL – Smudge on your Distress ink to create areas of colour

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2. ALL – let it dry COMPLETELY or blast it with the heat gun.  Distress ink stays wet for a bit and will grab the embossing powder if you rush this step.

3. ALL – stamp with Versamark or other clear embossing ink then sprinkle on clear (ideally DETAIL) embossing powder, depending on your stamp.

4. ALL – Heat emboss and let cool

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5.  ACRYLIC PAINT – using something smooth, like Cut ‘N Dry foam (can’t find mine, used a make-up sponge, and that is NOT as smooth) spread the black paint over the entire area.  You can let it dry and cover it again if any inked areas peep thru.

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6. ACRYLIC PAINT – with a slightly dried out baby wipe, daub off the paint from the embossed areas, revealing the trapped Distress ink under the embossing. DO NOT use a super wet wipe, and DO NOT rub hard.  You will take off too much of the paint.

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This is pretty much exactly as described in the original post.

5A. ARCHIVAL INK – smudge Archival Ink over the entire area.  You will find this easier (I suspect) if your ink pad is new and juicy.  Mine is older so I struggled to get a deep,rich, black cover.

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6A. ARCHIVAL INK – burnish off the Archival ink from the embossing.  Harder than it sounds.  I tried using the clean area of the make-up sponge, It worked OK but not great.

Then I tried a damp baby wipe.  Better,  but still the Distress Ink below the embossing wasn’t bright like with the paint.

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Then I tried a wetter wipe and it took away some of the ink on the background as well.  Here you can see the difference between the Archival Ink and the Paint.

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5M. MEMENTO INK – again, smudge the Memento ink all over the surface.  This was a background stamp so the areas to grab the ink were smaller.

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6M. MEMENTO – I almost didn’t need to bother burnishing off the ink.  Just the rubbing of the ink over the embossed areas with the make-up sponge removed any ink from the embossing.  The Memento is grabbed by the background card only.  So perhaps the EASIEST, but check out the next shot – even with the different sorts of stamps, I hope you can see the Memento isn’t super dark and rich.

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again, it COULD be my slightly tired ink pad.  I would expect Versafine to work in a similar way.

5P. PIGMENT INK – this worked a treat.  Smudged on the ink with a Colorbox teardrop, direct to paper.

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Nice and dark, good cover.  Some hint of the Distress Ink showing thru but a 2nd coat maybe would help.

6P. PIGMENT INK – I just knew that a wet wipe was the wrong way to go with this so I didn’t even try – I used a finger wrapped in dry paper towel to rub off the pigment ink. I did this while it was still slightly damp.  If it were super dry (and pigment ink takes a while to dry!) a very very slightly damp wipe might be OK.

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Really, that doesn’t do it justice.  The pigment ink is deep and dark, and the trapped Distress Ink is brighter than it looks.  Still not as bright as the PAINT version, but better than the Archival and almost as good as the Memento.

7. ARCHIVAL and PIGMENT ink – sandwich the piece between two sheets of paper – I used an old graph paper tablet – and iron off the embossing powder.  It will melt and get sucked into the paper

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and when you remove the paper…

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WOW.  Totally POPs.  Trade off is that the raised embossing from the clear powder is gone, so it looks more like plain old stamping, although you do get a bit of a halo effect on the edges, which is nice.  But colour-wise it’s pretty close to the brightness and intensity of the paint version, even if the black isn’t as nice for the ARCHIVAL version.

Not sure how to rank them, frankly.  The best technique is the one you have all the stuff for already LOL!  But in terms of cost, I suspect the PAINT is the cheapest (paint is dirt-cheap compared to an ink pad.)

In terms of fewest steps to get the best colour. I would say PAINT is the winner – with Memento closely behind if your ink pad is new and dark.

I think Pigment ink is closer to OK than not, stopping after rubbing off the ink, but better than Archival by a mile.

Then with an extra step and a flatter result, Pigment Ink and Archival are both good in terms of COLOUR when you iron off the embossing, but Pigment ink gives a better BLACK coverage.

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As ever, YMMV.  I really do think there are a lot of variables – how dark and juicy your ink pad is, how light, or heavy your hand when doing the wipe-off, how damp/wet your wipe is…. But overall I had forgotten how pretty this can look.

I’ll make a PDF of the post, although it’s the quick-and-dirty Readability version, so it requires me to post it first and then do the process, and come back to add the link.  If THIS BIT is hot (clickable) then it’s there and you can download it.  If not come back and it will be in bit.

And luckily, just before the power went out, I had printed a little spiky guy that I edited to include a bit of art.  DS is a fan of Nujabes (Japanese hip-hop artist, now sadly deceased) so I made him this little desk-top pal. Just for fun.

nujabes

I’ve finally worked out the best order to stick the bits to ensure the ears are nicely curved.  I haven’t folded the feet yet and may not, in case DS prefers the feet flat so you can see the sneakers….

 

 


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Glycerine and Distress Ink

I mentioned the other day that I had seen, briefly, on one of the craft channels, a demo for spritzing cardstock with glycerine to make Distress Ink move better on it.  I had to have a go, despite the fact that I had very little info. I have a bad habit of trolling thru the channels during commercials when watching something live, rather than actually watching the ads.  I’m told, from a commenter that Sheena Douglas was the demo.  I’m sure I’ve been by her blog for WOYWW and recognized her from other shows. She has a lovely bubbly personality and what I saw of her project, it was quite nice.

So, armed, as ever, with very little info, I just dived in. Oh and I have to share the mug DH got me – he finds the fact I blog amusing.  It actually says Be careful or you’ll end up on my blog, and is, I suspect, meant to be a threat.

glycerine

I mixed up about equal parts glycerine and water, maybe a bit more water, in a spray bottle.  I’m thinking a mini-mister with a very fine spray might have been better.

For my contrast, I just smudged on a bit of DI, using the normal technique of Cut ‘N Dry foam, starting off on the craft mat and moving on to the card.

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I tried a few different types of cardstock.  The first one, which almost put me off, was a super-smooth card, bought at a show, packaging long gone, but meant to be used for Copic colouring.  How bizarre is that flecked effect?

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I actually think the weird mottled effect is kinda interesting.  But I tried a few other types of card, smooth and textured, and on all of them the glycerine and water, def. made the Distress ink move more freely over the surface, and allowed it to blend nicely. On the left you see the un-sprayed plain cardstock and on the right, the spritzed with glycerine.

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Really, I didn’t even load up the foam – what little there was on the pad from doing the plain sample was enough to colour it.

I had an idea – I could see that the cardstock grabbed the ink very differently when the glycerine and water was sprayed on first.  So I grabbed a stencil – not even a clean one (like I have any of THOSE!) – and sprayed thru it.

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I let the mist dry for a while, even blasting it briefly with a heat gun. I first smudged on the Peacock Feathers, then the Peeled paint over that.  What a nifty two-tone sort of effect, very subtle.

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I tried a different stencil, and did Wild Honey. I actually did Fired Brick over that, and it looked really nice, but my camera batteries died and I am in the process of recharging them so you’ll just have to use your imagination.  Sorry about that.

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On caveat is that I have to say I feel just a little bit sticky.  I would def. spray inside a box or on something you can wash, and have baby wipes handy to clean off your fingers.  But it does work and really gives quite a soft and misty look to the Distress Ink.  I particularly like the thru-a-stencil version.  I do wonder about storing something like this long-term – we get mice coming in from the fields occasionally, and I remember them trying to gnaw thru the metal lid of some spearmint-scented ink pad I got with an old Club Scrap kit that was hiding in a box on a low shelf.  I wonder if the glycerine would tempt them to nibble away at a card?  I don’t think I’d use it on a scrapbook page, for example. Humm.  It rather sounds like I am talking myself out of using it, doesn’t it?  Maybe – or maybe I am just deciding I need to consider WHEN is a good time to use it, and if there is any other technique that might do similar, without the stickiness?


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The Distress Spritzer? well, not REALLY…..

This is one of those posts that is a weird confluence of events.  Someone once asked me Where do your ideas come from?  I thought for fun I would document it – the steps may be unique, but the process isn’t. It’s just the way my mind works and the benefit of a messy desk  Feel free to just look at the photos – they should tell you all you REALLY need to know.

1. I got an email from a UKS sponsor announcing they had received the new Tim Holtz Distress Marker Spritzer.  

The more I looked at it the more I was convinced I had one.  Not that exact thing, but something pretty similar. So I had a bit of a hunt and sure enough, in with my stamping markers (a drawer not opened since I got my Copics) there it was.

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This has to be 15-20 years old – I know I got it while in the USA so it would have to be.  I had a check for the name and while I see the odd reference to it they no longer sell it that I can find.

2. I popped a few random markers in to it.  One thing I can see is that mine seems to be lacking the inner liner for the pen-holder.  Not a big deal, it works well enough without it but I could always as one of those rubber pencil grips to super thin pens and I bet that would do the trick.

3.  As I was looking across my desk, my eye landed on one of my watercolour brush pens.  I thought, I wonder….

Now, I only have maybe two watercolour brush pens.  I’ve meant to buy some, after seeing Dyan from Art from the Heart show how she has as many water brush pens as she has colours of Dylusions and she uses them to colour with.  But I just never got around to it.  Deep in the back of my mind I had a tickle.  I KNEW that somewhere, probably in DDs “art cupboard” I had some kids version of the waterbrushes.  And guess what? Not only did I have them, I found them.

waterbrush

I know we got them maybe 8-10 years ago at Costco. Some of them are fairly empty.  I deconstructed one of them, thinking I could just replace the cheap ink with good ink, although I thought as the Dylusions aren’t waterproof either, I might as well just pick one or two of the near-empty ones to play with and use up the rest of the ink with mixed media stuff rather than just empty them.

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There is no seal on the pens, which surprises me as it’s for the kids market.  I would expect them to be sealed and you would need to buy new ones once these ran out. But no, they disassemble just fine.

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I tossed out the cartridge and the little slim tube.  For use with the spritzer you don’t WANT to slow the flow, like you would with a potentially messy pen, with kids, so I binned the cartridge and the tube.

4.  What to fill it with?  Obviously ink is going to be pretty much the same as using a marker, but then…

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Perfect.  Acrylic liquid ink. This gives me something, a matte and almost chalky look, that I am not going to get from a marker (I only have ONE Distress marker, the Picket fence one, so I don’t really know if that would be similar to using acrylic ink) and is waterproof. Note:

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And wipe over it with a baby wipe

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The ink on the wipe is not from the acrylic ink, it’s from rubbing the paint off the stencil.  It give a nice watercolour-y effect.  I also did the flip-and-stamp you might normally do with an ink loaded stencil. The acrylic ink dries really fast so the stamping part has to be done after a spritz of water  on the slick surface of the stencil, and you can also then smear the acrylic ink thru the stencil with a wipe. Kinda both on the same area here

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5.  And then, of course, there is WHITE.

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Using the spritzer gives you a way more controlled spray than the spray bottle does, so you would use this for either the Acrylic ink OR the Dylusions for this sort of scatter.

So there you go.  I’m still in my jammies and my hands are covered with ink and paint, and my stamp-storage tower (with the wood-mount stamps, where the Blitzer was hiding) is pretty much dumped out on the floor, but now I have a new toy to play with, a whole heap of waterbrushes, a bunch of ink to use up, and it’s only just after 9 AM.  Or was when I started typing….

And Texas Flood is playing from my playlist, the accident payment has been sent, DH is back from his conference, so no school run, and the house is pretty tidy (well, downstairs, anyway) and the laundry done.  Where can the day go from here?  Downhill, probably, but I can always hope ….

{grin}


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Just a few shares

I just wanted to quickly share a couple of things.  First the spray inks when printed using the Acrylic medium.  I sprayed them with water and they do smear a little but not as much as plain in does.  In fact, I rather like the misty effect.

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Next, I thought I would share a print or two made on a pretty dirty plate – the plain one was pulled thru the stencil and it pretty much masked the grunge on the plate, but the black grid on the ghost is the leftover from the star-masks from a couple of days back. Nifty!

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Closer:

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Next, the Spreecasts continue – yesterday there was one on what Julie calls Stendoodling (using stencils to doodle, both in creating the shape to doodle IN and/or to create the doodling.  I just did a simple pattern, using punchinella to do the small circles within the larger circles of the stencil and doing some lines.  I quite like it, although haven’t quite finished it. Another thing to play with a bit more.

stendoodle

I still want to find a face stencil I can cut to play with another technique (she calls her Zombie Girl) from the Face stencil Spreecasts.  If I like the process I may have to buy the real stencils!

 

 

 

 


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More Spray ink on the Gelli plate play

So much fun.  After briefly playing yesterday I was flooded with ideas to try so this morning I cleared a space on my desk and had some fun.

A couple of things – as I said yesterday, I am quite sure I read someplace that using inks on the plate was not recommended as it could stain it.  To be honest, I’m not bothered about having a pristine plate, but even so my gut feeling is that a clean plate and an oiled plate will make the process work better.  I THINK that both the oil and the acrylic medium sort of protect the plate from allowing the ink to really sink in to it.  But even if it DID, the baby oil cleaning will pull out any deeply embedded ink. But you have to decide if you want to risk it.  All I can say is thus far I’ve not had any problems getting the plate clean when I’m done.

Let me start off by adding a bit of info regarding the acrylic medium options, from yesterday’s post.  The medium seals, perhaps not totally, but significantly, the Dylusions spray inks.  And that is what I’ve been using.  Other inks may not work the same. I you think about it, when you pull a print, what is at the BOTTOM of the plate is going to end up on the TOP of the print.  I haven’t taken photos, and my camera is recharging at the moment, but I did brush over those prints and while the ink does move a little, it isn’t anything LIKE as smeary as usually it would be.  I’ll snap a photo r two when the batteries are fully juiced up.

Now, on to the further play.

The first idea came to me as I was looking at the very inky stencil.  Stamping off the excess ink when you use a stencil in the normal way is a pretty well-known technique.  But as I was looking at it I though Why can’t I put the stencil on the plate and both stamp off the ink and pull a print thru it at the SAME TIME? So that is exactly what I did. Now, I had used a letter stencil and we all know how they need to be reversed to read right when you pull a print.  Obviously the ink was on the wrong side, but I still did it.

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Bearing in mind I tried to be quick once I had the idea, but I wasn’t lightning fast. The ink was already starting to dry.  Even so I got a reasonable ghost print by removing the stencil and pulling the paint as well as the ink that squidged into the paint from making the first print.

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That told me, in theory, that the process would work. So I thought about the steps and the best way to get set up.

  • 1. I cleaned the plate and got the brayer clean and ready.
  • 2. I squeezed out a dollop of paint onto the plate but didn’t roll it out.
  • 3. I sprayed the stencil

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  • 4. I rolled out the paint QUICKLY and popped the inky stencil, ink up, on the plate then pulled the print.

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That pulled the ink off the stencil and the paint thru the stencil at the same time, giving me my two-layer print.  Again, the ink from the stencil migrated to the painted surface and once I pulled off the stencil I could pull the ghost.

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I felt like light paint would look best but then I saw that metallic gold tube from the circles AJ page a few days back.  I decided to use more of a mask, so I sprayed the ink onto one of my home-cut ones.  This is cardstock covered with contact paper, then cut out, so the ink really beads up.

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It didn’t matter at all.  Oh, and I also pressed some plastic canvas into the paint to texture it before laying on the inky mask.

When I pulled the print the ink spread to fill the areas where it had beaded up, as well as oozing into the paint on the Gelli plate.

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So cool! and the ghost print is just crying out to become something, but I don’t know what yet!

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Of course I then had to try a dark paint – well, red, anyway.  I did the same basic process for the first pull – although I think I went to heavy on the brown and to light on the yellow.  Still, nice enough

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But then, before I removed the stencil, I sprayed on a bit more yellow ink thru the stencil.  THEN I removed it and pulled that print.

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Like that one a lot too!

I’ve got a couple more things to try/show but this is already very long and photo heavy so I’ll stop it there. I would really love to see any play you get up to with this so do drop me a comment and add a link.  Have fun…..

 


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Spray inks on the Gelli plate

OK, so I’ve been watching Julie Fei-Fan Balzer and her free stencil classes on Spreecast. I’ve done a few of her online classes and always enjoy them.  She has been doing a Q&A at the end and one thing that comes up often is using spray inks on the Gelli plate.

When I first got mine, I remember reading, probably on the Gelli Arts site, that ink will stain the plate.  When I only had the 6×6 plate I worried I might ruin it, so I was more cautious that is my way.  Now I have the 8×10 as well, I feel a little less worried I might do something and ruin my plate!  Plus, discovering the baby oil when massaged into the plate will lift out any deeply embedded colour, I know I can clean it up with ease.  And that made me want to have a go.

Thinking things thru, as I do, I thought about using maybe paint as a base, then spraying the ink over that, but the colour of the paint would always affect the colour and at least for the first experiments I wanted to keep it pretty pure.  So I went to my much-loved Acrylic medium. Rolled that out onto the plate first, to give the ink something to cling to rather than beading up instantly.

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I was aiming for a very light spray – in fact I think I ended up with a bit more than I wanted.

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You can see it does bead up a little, in the areas of the heaviest concentration of ink, but in the lighter areas the ink just floats on the top.  I tried out a couple of stencils.  It seems like an overall pattern without too much of the stencil squidging int the ink, produces the best end result

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While I love the look of both of these, the right one, pulled thru the stencil, is pretty indistinct.  The left one , pulled after the stencil was removed, is really smeary but still cool.

That stencil has small open areas and a lot of stencil. This one has more open areas, plus it’s covered with layers of paint so the stencil doesn’t slide around as much.  I like both of these, but the print after removing the stencil ( left) is really cool.

 

 

 

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See?

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One thing I did try was then pulling a paint print over an ink print, masking off interesting areas so they show thru.  Def. something fun to play with a lot more!

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Clearly I’ve not perfected this quite yet, but you know me – I always share my experiments as I go.  Now I want to think on it a little more and see where I want to take it….


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Homemade stamp pad and white acrylic ink

So there was a post on UKS about white ink.  A trick that was shown at CHA for stamping with the Dylusions spray ink came up.  Now, I had this on the way via mail order, but hadn’t received it yet, and I didn’t have a blank stamp pad (another new product) so, as is my way, I went on a hunt in my overstocked craft room to see what I could come up with.

I grabbed a few things:  a bit of Fun Foam, a bit of fabric store felt (not the thinner, less dense craft felt, although I have that too and it might work almost as well) and an old dried up stamp pad.  I peeled off the dried foam from the stamp pad. I cleaned it of old ink and dried it, then stuck a bit of the felt to a bit of the fun foam (I had high-tack spray adhesive for curtain making on hand, but other stuff might work too)  and cut it to fit the empty stamp pad.

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I stuck it to the empty stamp pad with low-melt hot glue – I thought the hotter glue might melt the foam, and the low melt version was already in the glue gun anyway.

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I thought having a lid MIGHT make this something I didn’t have to wash out after use. I may cut a piece of plastic to cover the pad, a bit like the plastic over a Staz-on, tho’ not so tight-fitting, to see how that works.

I squeezed a bit, maybe a dropper full, of the Speedry liquid acrylic ink onto the pad and stamped with it.  I didn’t bother with mounts for the stamps, and to be fair I think that might have given an even better impression, but for all the types I tried they ALL worked well.

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Here you can see the range

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Nice and white, I think.  So I tried two other things – first using the acrylic ink on a bit of Cut&Dry foam, and then on an off-cut of the fun foam & felt version.

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A couple of points here.  First, the Cut&Dry foam is really deep and it holds a lot of ink.  For me, that means you either need to be very gentle when “inking” the stamp so you don’t get too much of the liquid ink in the depressions of the stamp (making the text in particular less crisp) OR you need to be very sparing with the ink when loading it – and that balance can be tricky.

See the orange, done with the C&D foam VS the purple with the fun foam & felt?

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Now, as this IS acrylic you do need to be sure to clean your stamps…I’m just sayin’…

So then I got my order and had a go with the Dylusions white ink – I really should have turned the bottle a bit but you should be able to tell that is what it is:

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Taking into consideration I am NOT using the suggested blank stamp pad, I think it’s pretty good – white, fairly crisp (as crisp as a loose floppy stamp is ever going to be LOL!) and even the smallest text is pretty clear.

But here is where it gets interesting.  My annoyance with all things ink and the fact they bleed when you apply anything wet over them has been mentioned before (often? Perhaps….) so my next step was to check the permanence.  With the acrylic ink I didn’t just wet the paper, I saturated it:

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and guess what?  It made NO DIFFERENCE at all. But even wiping over the spray ink version with a baby wipe, you are left with this:

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Side by side:

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So there you go. I DID try Distress stain as well (can you JUST see the bottle top middle of the photo above?) but I might as well take a photo of a plain black piece of paper, it was so … nothing.

What’s left? Well, I should try washing out the homemade pad to see what happens to it, and likewise I should try leaving it with the lid on for a week or two and see if the ink stays wet. If it doesn’t, how the dried ink will affect the pad might be worth seeing.  But to be honest making the actual PAD is something I would only do for white.  For the colours, I think I would use a bit of the fun foam & felt just loose,  then rinse it out when I was done stamping whatever ink colour I was using.  I did try mixing colours on the pad, which worked but my camera died at that point, and with DD unwell and home from school, I now need to spend some Mom time with her.