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Another Nearly No-Sew Knitted Heart Pattern

I was keen to make another no-sew heart, with slightly different proportions and with a bit of texture.   It took me a few sample knits to get it to where I wanted it to be, but I am finally happy with the results. The original No-Sew Heart is very simple, a pair can be whipped out in and hour or two, if you do the two at a time, as you would socks. It looks like this:

I will add the NEW PDFs right at the beginning then get on with the explanation so I don’t get 100 comments or emails asking where they are!

The Nearly No-Sew Textured Heart

The Nearly No-Sew Subtle Textured Heart

The new, textured version has a few more rounds, and a few special tricks to make closing the gap in the middle a bit easier. Here are a couple of samples (the subtle version sample photo is right at the end):

 

 

On the last pattern I talked about the KFSB (knit front, slip back) alternative to KFB.  I explained how knitting into the front of the stitch, then inserting the needle into the back of that same stitch as if you were going to go ahead and knit into the back, but instead slipping that stitch over to the right  needle still produces two stitches but omits that little bar across the front you get with KFB. I offered the KFSB as an alternative to KFB, and said feel free to KFB if you prefer, it would be fine.

This one? Not so much. In order to make the pattern work, the increases need to be on the first and last stitch of the increase rows rather than one stitch in.  The KFSB give a far neater and snugger line of increases.

Can you see the KFB stitches (on the left) are just a little baggy and open?

This is the KFB seen along the edge – see the gaps above the “braid?”

and this is the KFSB seen along the edge – much tighter and neater!

I hope I have convinced you to give this a go!

One other small change.  When dividing for the heart bumps, in this version you will have an uneven number of stitches.  The round has 21 stitches and can’t be divided evenly.  This makes for a happy accident, I think.  When you begin heart bump #1, you will knit 10 stitches from the front needle, then slip on to waste yarn the heart bump #2 stitches.

You will move 11 from the second half of the front needle and then 10 from the beginning of the back needle. You will then begin heart bump #1 with a K2Tog, which brings the two halves together, beginning to close the gap.

Once you complete heart bump #1, and are ready to begin bump #2, you will need to join your yarn in the middle.  Re-organize your stitches so there are 10 stitches on the front needle and 11 on the back needle,  BUT you must then move the extra stitch in the middle from the BACK needle to the front, to then K2tog in the same way.

This seems like a bit of palaver but it helps to both simplify stitch pattern AND results in fewer sewn stitches needed to close the gap.

Now, I don’t have an issue stuffing the heart nicely thru the open bumps and the centre gap, but it IS easier if you fully stuff the tip and lightly stuff up to the gap then do bump #2 and finally fully stuff the bumps before you fully close the gap.

I was lucky enough to get a fellow Ravelry user, who knit the original, review the pattern and knit a sample.  I think her sample photos show the superior look of the KFSB along the side edge as well!

Many thanks to  MingleYarns  for her help. It is much appreciated!

As a bonus, there is yet another way to make this pattern that you might prefer.  The texture is more subtle, but if you hate purling then this will be better. All you need to do is read every PURL stitch as a KTBL (knit thru the back loop, or make a twisted knit stitch, as you prefer.)

With this very simple change, and making only knit stitches (well, sort of!) you get texture like this:

I went ahead and did a replace P with Ktbl  edit and created what I am calling A Nearly No-Sew Subtle Textured Heart Pattern.  Just know that that is quite literally the ONLY CHANGE in Subtle Textured vs Textured – just substituting a knit thru the back loop for a purl.

Lastly, if the proportions of the textured versions are more pleasing to you, you need only add 5 knit rounds after round 18 on the original No-Sew heart pattern.  The original is as streamlined as I could make it for charity knitting, but the textured versions (and the + 5 rounds version) are great for any other heart-as-gift.


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New cast on for socks?

I almost NEVER make cuff down socks.  But recently I did.  In the process, I think it may have created a new sort of cast on.  It is a variation on what I think is called the double tail long tail cast on (or at least some versions with that name) but it gives a super stretchy and (I think) very decorative edge that works great for 2×2 ribbing for cuff down socks.  I had a hunt on YouTube and found this video, which isn’t the same but shares some characteristics with mine. And the re-arranging of the strand around the thumb is done clearly, so that is probably helpful.

 

Here is a shot of the final effect of my variation:

But the effect is different in the reverse, so you can adjust to make the side you prefer the right side:

And you can see the amount of stretch it offers:

My mate from Yorkshire tells me this is now the only cast on she uses, but to be fair she is a wicked tight knitter!

The first thing you need to do is double the tail and make a slip knot near the yarn end:

Arrange your yarn as if to do a standard long tail cast on, making sure the yarn around your thumb is the SINGLE STRAND. This is where it deviates from the double strand LTCO. Like a normal LTCO you will scoop the single strand and take it over the thumb loop, over the double strand and back thru the thumb loop

This creates your first stitch, next to the slip knot.  I count the slip knot as a stitch.

Now, you have to reposition.  Release the thumb loop and make the single strand come across your palm and around your thumb from the back to the front, like so:

Scoop the lower strand that is across your palm, bring the needle over the double strand, and back thru the loop.

And that’s it.  You will have created a pair of double-stranded stitches like so:

And you can already see how stretchy they are.  Treat each doubled stranded stich as a single stitch – so the above, circled, is TWO stitches::

Join to work in the round, and work a 2×2 rib

If there is a drawback it is probably that this might be tricky to cast on two at a time – I’ve not tried it, so I don’t know!

I am not sure what to call it!  How about ukmaryanne’s very stretchy double strand long tail cast-on variation for 2×2 cuff down socks?  LOL!  I’ll work on it and see if I can wedge in 10 or so more words, or make an stupid acronym… ukmaryanne’s very unique LTCO alternative?  That makes it UVULA <snort>

I never have used the cast on from the video but it also looks interesting so I have to give that a go. Not so far as to knit another pair of cuff down sock, to be fair, but just to see how it’s end result differs from my end result.  Maybe it isn’t so unique after all!

On a completely different note, I have been watching the National Theatre production of Frankenstein and it is outstanding.  Interestingly it stars two Sherlocks – Benedict Cumberbatch, the BBC’s Sherlock and Jonny Lee Miller from Trainspotting but also Sherlock in the US tv show Elementary.  There is a lot of great stuff coming up, I think each is only available or a week.  I’m gutted I missed Treasure Island.


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Socks – less a pattern, more a guideline

Because I knit virtually all my socks toe-up, and with a Fish Lips Kiss heel, it is really quite easy to slot in any stitch pattern I want.  I have, goodness, maybe 6 or more books of stitch pattern, but my favourites are from Wendy Bernard.  I have The Knitting All Around one, the Up, Down, All Around one, and her Japanese stitches one.  I love that there re lists in the back that sort the various patterns by stitch count, so if I want to see all the patterns that match my usual 68 stitches count, I can do it.  It is also pretty easy to figure out how to add a couple of framing stitches and use most patterns that way.

I saw a stitch pattern called the Alternating Slip Stitch, and quite liked the way it looked. I felt like it might work well for hand-dyed yarn, and decided to give it a go.  after knitting a bit of a swatch, I decided to omit one line, which made the pattern created more round then oval.

One of my mates asked for the pattern, but there really isn’t a pattern, I just slot in the stitch sequence to my existing framework.  But I wrote up a little description for her, and having gone to the trouble to do that, I figured I might as well share it.

Here is another look at the socks:

I always like how a slipped stitch pattern breaks up colour pools in hand dyed yarn

Anyway, if you fancy the look here is the most basic outline of what I did. and just a little tip – I placed the stitch pattern info quite specifically on the PDF.  I like to use a little clip like these:

although to be fair a paper clip works just as well, on the side of the printout,  to keep track of where I am in the sequence.

I am already working on another pair, which I am really liking a LOT, but I feel like the stitch pattern might work even better if I shift it a few stitches tot he right to centre the design, or if I flip one sock so they are a mirror image.  Perhaps more on that at a later date.

 


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Now-Sew hearts in the round, two at a time

Because I made the mistake of hiding the link at the bottom the last time I posted about these No-Sew hearts, I am going to put it at the top this time!

Here is the pattern

A few places here in the UK have asked people from shielded households to knit pairs of hearts.  This is one post I saw on Facebook:

Hello everyone 😊 I was wondering if any knitters can help us! My ward at Wigan hospital are unfortunately looking after extremely poorly Covid positive pts. At the moment no visitors are allowed on the ward as it is obviously extremely high risk. It is devastating for us to watch someone suffer without their relatives around them – although they do have us and we try our best to hold their hand and provide the best support that we can ❤️💜💗💙 we are looking to trial an idea whereby we give our patients a knitted heart and send a matching knitted heart to their relative/next of kin. We are looking for people who can knit that have ideally been self isolating and had no contact with anyone who could possibly be infected to send pairs of knitted hearts to us and we can then distribute them to our patients and their loving relatives who cannot be with them. I really do believe it would be so comforting to our patients and their relatives in such sad times and I’m hoping that we can facilitate this with your help. Thank you so much for taking the time to read and please please share this to anyone you think could help.

Ince ward at Royal Albert Edward Infirmary
Wigan hospital
Wigan Lane
WN1 2NN

another is this one and this one.  I made a few (made quite a few more since I took this photo!)

Hubby is going out tomorrow for his once weekly shopping trip and he will be dropping these in the post on his way.

As I make another pair, I thought I would show that it is quite easy to make them two-at-a-time, in the round as well.

Just cast on both hearts. It’s only six stitches to begin with so easy peasy!

 

Knit up to the point where you off-load half the stitches to create the first heart bump then work just on the bumps till they are complete.

When you are finished, thread thru the ends but remember, DO NOT pull the end tight.  Y will be stuffing the heart thru the two openings. You might find it easier to do the last rounds to make the second heart bump by working on one heart at a time.  Up to you….

All done.

 

and stuffed!

Knitting two at a time you can knock out identical pairs pretty quick!


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Internet issues

Sorry all.  I have no email at the moment and I depend on email notifications to alert me when I have a comment I need to respond to (for the DASH planner link or for a book folding template.)

 

I will TRY to go back and find all comments I have not replied to but if I miss you please comment again here and I will try to monitor it.

Hope you are all staying safe, washing your hands, and practicing social distancing! One of these may help…..

 


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Wreath Calendar done!

I have been working on the wreath calendars and have the one most people seem to like better done. I did play around with the fonts a little and like the vibe of this font :

You can download the PDF here.

I have been clearing up my craft spaces.  I finally have the sewing room sorted, mostly because I found an alternative for the storage of my son’s drum kits (one proper drums, one electronic, both HUGE) and that has allowed a better placement of furniture.  It really doesn’t help that that room is tiny, and has a sink in it – unlike most of the rest of the rooms there is not a fireplace in there.  This house has eight sinks upstairs (only three in actual bathrooms) and seven fireplaces in all, plus another 4 that have been blocked off or walled over.  It makes furniture placement a challenge! One thing I unearthed is a stash of clear CD covers, like I used to create the CD calendar project:

And this one:

I am about to start a major clear-out and re-org of my scrapbook space. This is likely to take some time LOL! My hope is that once the space is usable again I can actually get on with some crafting.  And I think I might have to do another CD calendar as my first project. Although, given the state of this room, it might by 6 months into the year before I manage it.  DOH!


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That Doily calendar – onesheets for 2020 thru 2022

I am always amazed at the number of requests I get for the same calendars over and over again.  The Doily calendar is one of those – although I think the pretty circle CD one is still the most requested one.

As I have been doing, I’ve made these for 3 years.

Small but enough for you to see what they look like, I think

You can grab the PDF here.

On a side note, I have noticed a number of posts on various blogs, doing a round up of 2020 calendars.  I’ve noticed this in previous years as well. The thing is, they all seem to repeat the SAME calendars across the board.  I usually have a calendar on those lists, and this year it is the leafy circles one:

In past years it has been this doily one, or the doily cards one.  But every year it’s the same.  One person posts a list and 10 other bloggers just shuffle the order and re-post the same darn calendars.  I make SO many calendars, it can’t be that it is always, year after year, that every round-up blogger picks THE SAME ONE.

But hey, if that is the style that is trendy, so be it.  At the very least it made me want to play around with the wreath concept a bit more.  Here are two I like, although I feel the fonts need to be changed, maybe.  Which do you prefer?


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Leap Year calendar one-sheet and updated Project Life graphics

I am working on the Doily one-sheets, as requested by an anonymous commentor, who says she has used them for the lat few years and wants the 2020 version.  Like with the month cards, I am doing 2020, 2021 and 2022.  A number of people have said they like to make 18 month or 24 month calendar gifts so it makes sense to do that.  ANYWAY, just a reminder – if you make a request, do be sure you add your info so I can get back to you.

In the meantime, I updated some old (2012!) Project Life cards and made a one-sheet calendar for leap year.

It has been AGES since I made any Project Life things and I am not sure how popular it is at the moment.  Comment if you still scrapbook that way.  These cards are slightly less than 3×4 so you can maintain the black border and (I think) round the corners of your base cardstock if you want to mount them on a colour.

Hope they are useful.  Hands up anyone who DIDN’T already know it was a leap year….

 

😀


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Year end goodies – just a couple

Hi all.

Hope your holiday season was a happy healthy and joyful one.

Looking back over my in-process stuff, I find a couple of things I mean to add and never did.  First, a sheet of book-folding fillers motifs.  People often find they have pages leftover, or maybe have a book that is bigger than needed for their project. These will help.  Also, maybe to add between two letters instead of a & for example.  I have a few sizes all on one sheet, just cut the one you want out!

and the other is a one-sheet calendar for 2020.  I found a glitch, where one day was in the working file bit for some unknown reason failed to appear in the PDF.  VERY weird.  I thought it was going to be a hunt to figure out what was making it happen, but in the end all I had to do was re-save as PDF and there it was.

Or at least it appears to be there – do tell me if 31st May disappears when you print it…..

Have a Happy New Year if I don’t get back before then!