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Forgotten calendars – worth adding? 2019-22, Dogs, Cats and Project Life.

In rummaging thru some of my folders of half-forgotten work, stuff I abandoned for one reason or another, I found a few things that I thought MIGHT have an audience. Some of them I updated in my Tall Box calendar style.

I made another set of One-Sheets for 2019 thru to 2022.  They use a similar sketchy design as the cards here.  Links to both the Sunday to Saturday and Monday to Sunday options in that post.

It could either be a plain, simple B&W one OR you could opt to colour it in.  You can download that here.

I also had requests from different people, for a DOG or a CAT calendar.  I always had dogs growing up, never been a cat person at all, but having had more than one person ask about them I figured I might give it a go.  I had found a font that I thought was cute, that had some really quirky little drawings of cats and dogs.  To be honest, for some of them I found it hard to tell which was which! I mean, look at this:

I added the whiskers cause I thought that was what made it look more cat-like.  Flipped it looks more bulldog-like, sort of.  Anyway, I had made the calendars but never added them.  I will.  Comment and tell me what you think. Cat:

 

 

And Dog:

Lastly, I’ve kinda jumped off the Project Life bandwagon.  I used to do a lot of designs for cards, not just calendars, but they seem much less popular at the moment.  As my time (and energy level) is pretty limited, I generally tend to do things I know (or at least think I know) will be useful.  This is a set of calendar cards I made ages ago and never added.

I liked them pretty well, I just didn’t LOVE them.  If YOU like them, grab them here.

I have a few others that I might update (like a little cartoon monster one for kids – thought it would be cute printed BIG for their wall each month) but any thoughts you have feel free to comment them here.


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2019 calendars – some musings, and some calendars

I have been making calendars for quite a while.  I learn new things about the process every year.

I was testing out a new process (boring, work-flow stuff) and had a thought I might do a calligraphy style calendar.  Luckily, just as I started working on it, I got a ping-back request from Lolly Jane for their yearly round-up.  And guess that? of the calendars they feature, a ton of them have calligraphy month names.  Maybe even the majority of them.  (Of course they featured the doily one – I am so tired of that one, but people do keep asking for it so I guess I’ll keep making it.  Actually that has given me an idea…) While I thought the font I picked was super cute (and not a freebie one so not common) it was such a crowded field no one needed yet one more in the same style.

Saved myself a ton of work there then.

Instead, I decided to do something totally different – and because I really wanted to test out this work-flow process, I had to make two. Here they are – one black and white, but definitely not at all calligraphic:

and one bright and colourful:

Now, these will print at any size you like.  When printing, look at your dialog box.  Expand the Paper Size option.  Here you can see all the native options for my (new A3) printer.  Yours will have similar.  At the bottom thee are my own specified “custom sizes” like coin envelopes or a 1/2 US letter size:

So if you want to print this as a sheet for your planner, you can.  You can print it as a Project Life size card or as a huge wall calendar:

Virtually any calendar can be printed in virtually any size, if it is a PDF – some jpgs might work but if the resolution is low they might not be as crisp and clear as you would like.

My process seemed to work OK so I may explore a few other options throughout the year.  Probably NOT a calligraphy one ‘tho.  LOL!

Time to update my own page of 2019 calendars – I’ll probably try to do that and post in the next day or two.  Now, about that idea….

 


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Can it legit be called a “technique” if it works only 25% of the time?

I’m thinking NO.

I was super excited when I discovered that it is possible to pull a resist print from the Gelli plate by stamping with pigment ink onto glossy paper from a magazine, then pressing that to a gel plate covered with paint.

From yesterday, this was literally the first one I tried:

I think we can all agree there was, upon seeing that, reason to be excited.

I tried a fair few prints later in the day, using many different ink and paint combos and had nothing like the success of that one. Even the other ones from the same session were good, but not as impressive:

So, I thought I needed to sit down and do a rather orderly series of attempts to see what happened.  Try to come up with a set of rules that would, if not guarantee success, would at lease make it more likely.

Not bloody likely, more like it. This is the array of stuff I tried – and it looks like I cut out the Crafter’s ink pad and the Studio G one:

This is what I got:

For the most part, a pretty appalling array.  I did discover a few things.  First, and most disappointingly, the only pigment ink that works consistently was the one from the Greetings Card kit.  None of the ColorBox inks of any kind worked at all – not the pigment (tried a few colours) not the Chalk ink, not the Cats eye ones.  The Studio G left a very very faint hint and might be worth trying again with a jucier pad.

In all cases, at least some of the magazine text transferred.  So I feel confident the paper is not the problem.

What worked 95% of the time was:

There’s the Crafter’s ink!

The rules, so far as I can determine thus far are:

1. The paint on the plate must be thin – almost thin enough to be called transparent.

2. The pigment ink must be wet.  Ink, stamp on the glossy paper, then flip it over on to the plate and burnish the back right away.  Don’t dawdle. If the ink is too dry it seems to work less well.

3. Let it dry 100% before adding the next layer of paint and trying to pull the print off.

4. Again, this layer needs to be thin, but don’t overwork it.  Load the brayer off the plate, roll on the paint and brayer just enough so you can see the image thru the paint.  Pull the print quick – don’t let they paint get too dry!

That process resulted in these:

The lower right image used the Crafter’s ink and the Basics paint.  The other two used the Greetings Card ink and Basics paint for the upper right and Crawford & Black for the left one.

As for the most part you are going to only have ONE CHANCE to get a good result, this might just be a little too frustrating to actually try to justify as a technique.  To my mind, if 90% of people, using 90% of common variations on the basic supplies can’t get a good result at LEAST 50% of the time, it just might be filed away as interesting, but annoying and potentially wasteful.

But it sure has been fun!

 


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Gelli plate play – it’s been tooooo long

NOTE:  Might be worth reading the next post before you embark on the stamping technique!

I have not really felt up to much crafty play for quite a while.  BUT I have been dreaming about the Gelli plate and remembering how much fun it was to play with.  I watched a video – well more than one, I’m sure – about resist transferring of a magazine image on to the plate, which you then pull off by doing a basic, heavy-bodied paint pull.  This one is the first one I saw, I think.

There was mention in some videos about the combination of the ink and glossy paper quality making a big difference.  Looking thru may magazines, which are mostly scrapbooking ones, I came across my ancient Rubberstampmadness mags.

The paper seemed thick and glossy and it also seemed that the image weren’t fashion shots but art and stamp samples.

There are a lot of stamp catalogs full of cool images, and some printed art work, like the BEAUTY image here that would all make very cool prints or additions to other art.

 

And guess what?  They worked a treat.

One video mentioned that some people had success with printing on an ink jet printer and doing the same process.  I did not.  I tried printing on pain paper, photo paper, on coated matt cardstock, on sticky label paper, etc. etc.  and nothing worked.

So that gave me a bit of an idea.  If I stamped on to the glossy paper, might that transfer? I experimented with about 8 different inks and a stamp.  The ones I had the highest hopes for (Archival Ink, Clearly Better clear stamp ink, Staz-on and Memento) were all fails.  Not expecting much I tried Distress ink, Distress Oxide ink, Adirondack and Kaleidoscope.  Also all fails.

Just on a whim I tried PIGMENT ink.  Crazy, but it worked.

I did have a few fails using cheaper paint but the Basics was good pretty much every time.

The process is simple.

1. Stamp the image using pigment ink. Get a good coating of ink on the stamp.

Sorry for the poor quality there – I had already used the image before I realized the photo was crap.  Doh! I suspect things like Versamagic or maybe even chalk ink MIGHT work, and COLOUR pigment ink will add a different dimension to it if it works! – I’ll try that next and see. But this is very generic black pigment ink.

I let the image dry but when I tried to dry it with the heat gun then transfer it, it didn’t work.  So I think the ink needs to by dry-ISH but not super dry.

2. Roll the paint onto the gelli plate.  I find the darker colours work best for this stage. You need a thin coat but not too thin.  Press the stamped image into the paint – I burnished one with a teflon spreader. one with my fingernail, one with a spoon.  Just make sure you get good contact.

LET IT DRY.

Remember the old Creative Palette that I hated?  I used one of the bits to roll out the white paint and get a thin coat on the brayer.  But you can also load the brayer by rolling in in paint on scrap paper.  Not too thick a coat.

As mentioned in a few of the videos, if you can SEE the image slightly, it’ll be a good print. Pull it.  Give the back a good rub.

And the coolest thing is that the text from the magazine transfers too!

I am so happy to have had a play.  It was seriously fun.  And now I know I can use my stamps as well as magazine images I am looking forward to more playtime!

Maybe even more regular blogging?  Maybe…..


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Cute Christmas Tags – easy cut for a change!

Hello and Happy Holidays!

Every year I create Christmas tags for my own wrapping.  I often create circles, because I have the punches and they are easy.  But some people have told me that not everyone has a circle punch of the right size, and dies are too hard to do many cuts quickly.

SO, this year, I made a simple grid of tags.  Not a lot of white space except at the edges, and it should print on any size paper, A4, US Letter, even smaller, if you want teeny tiny tags.

Cute, hummm? You can download the sheet here

Hope they help with your holiday wrapping!

 


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Requested – 2019 gradient One-Sheet calendar

 

Funny, people seem to have real favourites when it comes to calendars!  Every year I used to try to come up with something new, but most times, people comment to say Gee I love THIS one, will you be updating it? Which is easier on me, I’m not gonna lie.  This is one of those.  I like it too, and it wasn’t hard to do so here it is!

Download it here!

 

 


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Book foldings – cats

Super quick.  My boiler packed in this AM.  Typical.  At least it is not super cold today!

Anyway, I was sending out some cat-related book fold requests and I thought I might as well share them – I am not one myself, but I know there are cat-fanatics out there that will appreciate them!

Even I have to admit these are cute.

Grab the three page PDF here!


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Remembrance day poppy folds

Hey there.

It’s been a busy few weeks, with visitors coming and going. The last one is due back from a side trip today and will be gone next week.  Phew.

Triggered by a request for a “Lest We Forget” pattern, here are a few I designed.

There are the two poppies, which would work ok as a straight book fold.  They might work best as a combined Cut&Fold.  If they are done so the central section of the flower is concave, you could easily add a printed bit that says REMEMBER or the date or something similar. Don’t be worried by the overlapping darker areas in the first one.  They do not print like thatDownload that set here.

The initial Lest We Forget design is one that was requested.  The ones with the poppy variations I thought might be easier to do.  You can get that trio of designs here. I think it is very clear that those will only work as Cut&Folds!  Very complicated!

Additionally you could Cut&Fold (or maybe just fold?) the Lest We Forget words and add a poppy (knitted, crocheted, paper, whatever) in the middle rather than folding it!

If you make one PLEASE share it!  I’m sure people would like to see it.

 

 

 

 


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A few more 2019 Calendar bits

It has been quite the madhouse around here, on all fronts.  But I do have a few follow-up calendar things for you.

First I have a set of the circle calendars with journaling space beside them – nice for PL style spreads or even to add to a layout.  You can download them here.

And as another variation of that, a smaller set that I think would work well for a birthday calendar.  Print on cardstock and punch a hole for a book ring and there you go. And you can download that one here.

 

And lastly, another couple of bold calendar squares for making tear-offs.  Note the darker dividing lines.  I’ve had some feedback that the very pale lines are harder for older eyes to follow.  If having the lines show is annoying, simply cut just INSIDE the lines and they should still stack fine for a tear off. Download the 2 page set, black and brown, here.

Hopefully that will keep you happy as I am off doing touristy things with visitors, till November!

🙂