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Mount for unmounted stamps – my best use for the Creative Palette (and a cheap alternative)

So there is history here.  You might like to go back and read a few previous posts (or not, as you prefer.)

  • My review of the CP v the Gelli plate and where I die cut it with my Sizzix

That last link is full of warnings – press the stamp HARD onto the CP.  Don’t use it in this way if you worry about messing up whatever you are stamping on to. Shake the mount.  Wash the backs. blah blah blah.

I kept finding that, with every use, the CP surface got less and less sticky and washing it was too much of a bother if I had to do it every time I wanted to stamp an unmounted stamp.

I store most of my unmounted stamps like so:

In binders, and then in baseball card sleeves:

I have not ever wanted to go to the expense of mounting all the stamps, and bulking up the binders.  So over the years I have come up with a few different methods that work for me.  Generally, a strip of strong double-sided tape on a clear mount will do the trick.

I bought a bottle of Aileens Tack It (over & over) cause lots of people recommended it as a good way to make the red rubber, unmounted stamps into “cling” stamps.  It works, sure, but then you have to store all these sticky backed stamps. Ah … No.

Fast forward to the post of CP as mount and….an idea!

Yep.

Why this works – first, the CP is just a bit spongy.  Not too spongy, but enough that it acts as both the mount and the cushion and gives a nice image (might have been nice had I actually shown that – sorry, I’m out of practice at blogging) especially when stamping on to my cork-floor-tile-in-a-big-ziplock-bag stamping mat. Second, there is only the couple of CP chunks that are sticky. Easy to store.  I keep a lot of plastic packaging.  This is from a Spellbinders die.  I just flipped the halves so rather than tightly encasing the die, there is a slim open area that fits two of the sticky CP bits.

Perfect fit.

Now, this makes sense for me because I already own a (mostly useless for the kind of monoprinting I like to do) Creative Palette.  But the CP is not widely for sale anymore (or not that I could find) and if you don’t already have one, this is not a good enough reason to go buy one.

As a cheap alternative, I had a go at coating a piece of sticky-backed fun foam with the Tack It.  It worked just fine.

There is a slight issue with the fun foam being quite thin.  When you press to stamp the sticky surface can just grab the paper – I found this to be most problematic with tissue paper, not at all an issue with a paint-coated journal page, for example.  I did not find it as much an issue with the CP-as-mount.

In hunting for my CP package, I unearthed a nice gelli-print, so I can add at least one decent looking image for you LOL!:

Now I must decide what to do with it.

If you have a Creative Palette gathering dust, why not turn it into a set of stamp mounts? If you don’t have one, try the sticky-backed fun foam.  Let me know if it works for you!


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Gelli plate play – it’s been tooooo long

NOTE:  Might be worth reading the next post before you embark on the stamping technique!

I have not really felt up to much crafty play for quite a while.  BUT I have been dreaming about the Gelli plate and remembering how much fun it was to play with.  I watched a video – well more than one, I’m sure – about resist transferring of a magazine image on to the plate, which you then pull off by doing a basic, heavy-bodied paint pull.  This one is the first one I saw, I think.

There was mention in some videos about the combination of the ink and glossy paper quality making a big difference.  Looking thru may magazines, which are mostly scrapbooking ones, I came across my ancient Rubberstampmadness mags.

The paper seemed thick and glossy and it also seemed that the image weren’t fashion shots but art and stamp samples.

There are a lot of stamp catalogs full of cool images, and some printed art work, like the BEAUTY image here that would all make very cool prints or additions to other art.

 

And guess what?  They worked a treat.

One video mentioned that some people had success with printing on an ink jet printer and doing the same process.  I did not.  I tried printing on pain paper, photo paper, on coated matt cardstock, on sticky label paper, etc. etc.  and nothing worked.

So that gave me a bit of an idea.  If I stamped on to the glossy paper, might that transfer? I experimented with about 8 different inks and a stamp.  The ones I had the highest hopes for (Archival Ink, Clearly Better clear stamp ink, Staz-on and Memento) were all fails.  Not expecting much I tried Distress ink, Distress Oxide ink, Adirondack and Kaleidoscope.  Also all fails.

Just on a whim I tried PIGMENT ink.  Crazy, but it worked.

I did have a few fails using cheaper paint but the Basics was good pretty much every time.

The process is simple.

1. Stamp the image using pigment ink. Get a good coating of ink on the stamp.

Sorry for the poor quality there – I had already used the image before I realized the photo was crap.  Doh! I suspect things like Versamagic or maybe even chalk ink MIGHT work, and COLOUR pigment ink will add a different dimension to it if it works! – I’ll try that next and see. But this is very generic black pigment ink.

I let the image dry but when I tried to dry it with the heat gun then transfer it, it didn’t work.  So I think the ink needs to by dry-ISH but not super dry.

2. Roll the paint onto the gelli plate.  I find the darker colours work best for this stage. You need a thin coat but not too thin.  Press the stamped image into the paint – I burnished one with a teflon spreader. one with my fingernail, one with a spoon.  Just make sure you get good contact.

LET IT DRY.

Remember the old Creative Palette that I hated?  I used one of the bits to roll out the white paint and get a thin coat on the brayer.  But you can also load the brayer by rolling in in paint on scrap paper.  Not too thick a coat.

As mentioned in a few of the videos, if you can SEE the image slightly, it’ll be a good print. Pull it.  Give the back a good rub.

And the coolest thing is that the text from the magazine transfers too!

I am so happy to have had a play.  It was seriously fun.  And now I know I can use my stamps as well as magazine images I am looking forward to more playtime!

Maybe even more regular blogging?  Maybe…..


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Folding the inserts (map fold book)

I’ve already explained the map fold, so this is more to save yo ruining a piece of paper yo want to use by making a wrong fold. Firstly, look at how hugely different the labels die cut can be folded.

2bracketmap

3bracketmap

I suppose you could make a case for both versions being useful, but the one on the right (in the bottom photo, left in the top one) is the one that offers the most useable space, I think.  That is the one I will explain.  You can make the other version by just switching the bump and point folds. I trust you can identify a bump and a point….

foldunits

1. Begin by folding the piece in half, two bumps together.

2foldunits

then fold the other two bumps together, keeping the mountain folds on the same side

3foldunits

2. With the mountain fold on the inside, fold in half, matching the points.

4foldunits

Matching the mountain folds of the point-to-point fold, collapse the unit. You will end up with this:

6foldunits

 

3.  Fold in the sides, keeping the top of the fold as level as you can, leaving just a smidge of a gap in the middle

7foldunits

 

8foldunits

and fold the reverse side to match.

9foldunits

4.  This is the tricky reverse-the-fold bit.  

10foldunits

Unfold each fold, and reverse the centre fold so the bump is inside.

5. Done.

11foldunits

 

The trick with paper that has an actual directions, that needs to be seen right side up, is to orient the paper correctly to begin with.

directional

2directional

 

Make sure the single point to point fold goes top to bottom

3directional

 

It only looks wrong – the flat (unscored) areas are the “pages” where the unit is stuck inside the book base.

4directional

 

5directional

I am going to add the PDF of the shaped areas, without the poem, as it is more useful and no one really expressed any interest in having the with-text version.

boybookblanksYou can easily create the sized text blocks and print them then stick the cut out bits over the test and print again.

Have fun!  You know, I have a set of rectangular brackets as well –  I wonder….

 

{wink}

 


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Construction of the Map Fold Books

This post has the potential to be excessively long.  I am going to break it up into a couple of posts to keep that from happening.  Also, I am off out very soon.

So without further ado, here is the basic construction.

1. The book base is constructed of three folded sections.  The measurements for the one I will show are

two 4 x 8 inch pieces of cardstock, scored and folded in half

one 12 x 4 inch piece, scored at 4 inches, 8 inches, and 8 1/2 to 8 3/4 inches.  This will create a fold over flap so the thickness of the book  will determine the size.  This should help:

bookbase

 

2. Stack the pieces and carefully punch five evenly spaced holes thru the centre folds

2bookbase

3bookbase

and sew together with a 5-hole pamphlet stitch.  This is the image I go back to over and over again when I forget!

4bookbase

That is the basis for all of the books.  The inserts for THIS one begin with not a square, like normal, not a circle, like my previous variation, but with a large bracket, cut with the Spellbinders Grand Nestabilities, Grand Labels One.

6addpages

To add the pages, stick one side of the folded unit to the left (or right) page.

addpages

Add adhesive to the other side – I usually don’t cover the whole face bit focus on the centre line and the straight bits on the sides

2addpages

Fold over the next page, making sure the corners are lined up, and press to stick.

3addpages

6addpages

Ta dah!

You can close the book with a simple ribbon or cord tie, like I did the previous sample

4hungarianmapfold

or add a two-button wrap, or any other closure you fancy.

In the next post I will talk about folding the pages from the label – there are a few tricks to it, especially with directional paper – and share show I added the text.  I should be able to share that as a PDF so you can print and cut, rather than taking the time it took ME to set it all up.  Here’s a sneaky peek:

The file looks like this:

boybook1

 

I do also have a sheet with the shapes, but blank, so you can add your own text.  The print looks like this:

insert

and the page looks like this!

photostoo

I’ll interject here that I know not everyone is going to have these big labels.  So if you want to see the printable file for a circle page or a square page, comment and let me know.  It’s a bit of effort but I think I can do it when I return if there is interest.  I may even go ahead and do What is a Girl? (also by Alan Beck) as well as I do have one of each!

 


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Hungarian Map Fold Book

So the bookmaking group I am on (pretty darn nearly the only thing that ever drives me to log in to Facebook) had a challenge for a Turkish Map Fold book.  You may recall I reposted quite an old PDF of instructions that had disappeared from the net. I’ve always like this fold, and had a bit of a play with it.  The book was cute enough, but I had to make another one so I could improve the construction.  As this is going to be VERY photo intense I’ll just show you the bare bones – a three-folds pamphlet with a flap.

TMP

The Turkish map folds are stuck two together and then stuck between each section. I’ll do another post about the construction but today I want to explain the HUNGARIAN map fold, a variation on this one, and my circular variation on that.

There is a great post here with the basic fold. That is for a square piece.  And don’t be fooled by the video that may pop up – it’s for the Turkish fold, not the Hungarian one. Although to be fair it is only one additional diagonal that differentiates the two, and by sticking the units so one piece is flat, mine really ends up being more Turkish than Hungarian LOL! But orienting the text is easier with the additional diagonal, I think.

Let me show you the finished  book first.  4hungarianmapfold

I would say e.e. cummings is my favourite poet and this one of my favourite poems. This is what the it looks like opened.

hungarianmapfold

but without the inserts. Unlike the Turkish one from yesterday, this one has only ONE insert between each section. The inserts are heavier weight than the graph paper so two would have made the book VERY thick.

2hungarianmapfold

I’ll be showing you folding specifically for the placement of the text as well as folding a “diagonal” on a circle the only thing you need to know that the original linked page doesn’t cover.

1. I printed the text across the middle of pink graph paper.  

circlehungarianmapfold

Fold the circle in half bottom to top, across the text.  Use the lines of text to make sure the fold is straight across

2circlehungarianmapfold

2. Open and fold, again with the text on the outside, in half side to side.  

3circlehungarianmapfold

Flip it over.  It should look like this:

4circlehungarianmapfold

3. Fold the diagonals by matching the fold lines.  This is the only tricky fold.

5circlehungarianmapfold

4. Fold the second diagonal by matching the top and bottom fold lines of the first diagonal

6circlehungarianmapfold

5. Collapse the piece.  It should want to collapse, if you’ve done the folds right.

7circlehungarianmapfold

Note the orientation of the text.  You want the flat area to be the text area. Once collapsed it will look like this:

8circlehungarianmapfold

6. Mark each unit at the same point – can you see the tiny dots?

9circlehungarianmapfold

then fold in the side to meet the point.

10circlehungarianmapfold

7. This sounds tricky but it isn’t.  REVERSE the folds so those triangle on the top switch to being INSIDE the unit.  Open them

11circlehungarianmapfold

and push on that middle fold to push it inward

12circlehungarianmapfold

Re-crease the folds.  It will change from the left image to the right one.

13circlehungarianmapfold

And THAT is the circular Hungarian Map Fold. These inserts are just smaller units than the cardstock ones and the fit inside perfectly.  I didn’t go to any extraordinary lengths to get the units in exact proportion, I just made sure the marking and fold-in sides were similar, and that was good enough for them to nest nicely. I did stick them only in the very centre, which I think would help accommodate slight variations

2nested

3nested

and yet they collapse fine.

nested

 

I experimented with a number of circle sizes and they all seem to nest nicely.

It would make a nice card too, just one fold.

I think it’s just a pretty little book.  I also think the flat areas that hold the text could easily hold photos and you could add journaling or other text to the smaller folded areas by the print/cut/stick method, or hand write it if yo prefer the circles open up relatively flat.  Well, dang.  Now I have to make  a photo one too.  Argh.  Maybe I’ll photo that for a step-by step for the construction…

{sigh}

And I can do the straight Turkish fold on a circle and see if it really is the same (minus the extra diagonal) and if it matters.

Jeez.  I am so out of practice for these tutorial sorts of posts.  I’ll try to be more concise for the next one,  just need to get my groove back.

And finish those last few ATCs before Wednesday!

 

 

 


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Double beanies – pattern for Magic Loop

I finally mailed off the package of beanies.  Hopefully the crochet version will get an OK and I’l share it.  But in the meantime, I had a couple of emails from people asking about the Magic Loop version of two-at-a-time.  As I had annotated the original pattern for myself, I figured I might as well write it up.

I like making one girly one and one boyish one when I do two at a time.  And while I did manage three at a time, the problem is with keeping the yarn straight.  The middle ball needs care and attention, much more than just two do.

doublebeanies

I wanted to try adding an active link to my PDF – I had to use a different program than I usually do so it was learning something new.  It worked, but when I view it the links don’t look active, until you hover over them.  THEN you can see the cursor that indicates a clickable link and clicking will open the page in your browser.  I wanted to add links to videos or instructions that I found useful. I have ones for the Limitless Cast On for 2-at-a-time ANYTHING, a general 2-at-a-time sock video, invisible joining to knit in the round (and I also find this trick helps me not let the stitches twist when joining) and as the beanies need to stretch and not be too tight, a couple of stretchy cast on videos.

Here is a PDF.  Any feedback would be very welcome!


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Print Friendly or PDF button!

In the past I have blogged about ways to turn any blog post into a PDF using Readability.  This is great because YOU are the one in control – you need not depend on the blogger to make it happen.   But as a blogger I wanted to add something for my readers that was easy.  I found a useful plug-in for WordPress called PrintFriendly.  Even better, it is available for a number of platforms, so all you Blogger bloggers can use it too.

pf

Just select the platform you use and follow the simple instructions.  Once you do, here is what it looks like on my WordPress blog:

printfriendly

If you click that button, you get the option to create a print-friendly page without all the clutter at the top, bottom and sides – that looks like this, for a recent post (and you can see the page here for comparison):

pagesample

See at the top? you can print the page, you can tick REMOVE IMAGES to print just the text (which seems not useful for most things I do, but you never know…)

noimages

or create a PDF – and that offers you a fair few options that YOU control

pdfoptions

I’ve not explored all the options, but will do someday when I have the time.

Now, this is clearly dependant on the blogger (i.e. ME, in this case) adding that button for you.  But if YOU are a blogger and want to make it easy for your readers to print and/or save a post as a PDF, you can add this button.  I know on WordPress there is a way you can add the button just on specific posts – so if I did a very long and detailed post, on a technique, or a tutorial for something like a mini-album, I could opt to add that button. People who wanted to could create a PDF or print the post easily, rather than me creating a PDF myself.  Not all posts are worthy of printing or PDFing LOL!   but for example, what about a crochet pattern?  Might be nice to have it as a PDF rather than a cluttered page print, yes?

I’ll probably point out the button in posts that I think people might like to convert or print, but it’ll be there on every post.

 


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Text converter

It’s Bank Holiday here in the UK and while the garage is done (YAY!) there are an unreasonable number of “junk drawers” that need sorting.  Given the miserable weather, that seems a perfect task for the day.

But I did get a comment/request on my post yesterday asking about the list of words – did I have them in ALL CAPS, like I used for my words.  I didn’t, and while I am always happy to help I just wasn’t going to re-type the whole list in order to get them in ALL CAPS.  Sorry, that isn’t the best use of my time LOL!  But I did find a super handy online text converter.  There are LOADS of these sorts of tools available.

Text converter – this will convert text to ALL CAPS, initial caps, all lower case, alternating caps (remember when that was all the rage? ) and sentence caps.

& A A A A ABOUT ALL ALWAYS AM AN AND AND AND AND ANY ARE ARE ARE ART ART ARTIST ARTISTIC AS AT AT BE BEAUTIFUL BEAUTY BECAUSE BEGIN BEING BELIEVE BENEATH BEST BETTER BETWEEN BIG BIG BLACK BLEND BLUE

or check this one out!

& a a a a aBoUt aLl aLwAyS Am aN AnD AnD AnD AnD AnY ArE ArE ArE ArT ArT ArTiSt aRtIsTiC As aT At bE BeAuTiFuL BeAuTy bEcAuSe bEgIn bEiNg bElIeVe bEnEaTh bEsT BeTtEr bEtWeEn bIg bIg bLaCk bLeNd bLuE BlUr bOy bRiGhT BrUsH

Alphabetizer – takes a list of words and puts them in alphabetic order. That one takes a block of text, alphabetizes it, and you can select to add a line feed after each word to create a list

always
am
and
happy
help
I
to
while

There is also a tool on that page to remove line breaks – so if you found a LIST and wanted to convert it to a block of text you can do it with a click. And there are separate tools to convert to upper or lower case, and to capitalize sentences, but the first link offers all that in one place, which is why I prefer it.

Word Search creator: Remember this set of printables for Christmas cards? Here is the link again for the word search creator.  Very handy.

WScards3

And while I’m at it, don’t forget the Kuler Color Theme tool! It is so easy to pick a theme, and unlike some, it has more than just three colours.  I like that – and I like the display that includes the RGB values for the colours and use that A LOT when creating my printables.

color

I also like that you can tweak a theme with the tools, or change it completely with the COLOR RULE menu.

And since I am doing a post of links, I really have to add Taxedo and Wordle, for creating word clouds. All sorts of fun applications for them.

Have fun

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Not a fork, but it works – looms again

DD was very keen on me making a fork-like loom so I could teach her some of the patterns. She did look at the more complicated ones in the magazine, but they were really beyond her to follow.  But the add loop, hook off process of the fork- style patterns (not all of them but at least SOME of the more complex designs) look very teachable so while she is off skating, I made one.  I used a couple of domino style things from a set I’ve had for ages, and an old block. It has issues, but basically, it works.

forklike

I thought at first that the spacing of the two forks, taped, would be what I wanted to mimic, so I eyeballed it, marked the placement on the block,

2forklike

then touched the tines to an ink pad to mark the wood.

3forklikeI glued the wood to the block – the dominos are softer wood so they were easy to hammer in to begin with, then the block is much denser but it only has to go in a bit.

The panel pins have a very small head on them – big enough to hold the bands in place but small enough for easy hooking off.

4forklike

I simply hammered them in for this first version, but for the next one I did pre-drill holes.  The thin domino wood split slightly and I wanted to avoid that for the second version.

5forklike

Now the thing about the fork is that although the tips are spaced like this, you are really working on the middle of the fork so the pins really should have been closer together. See how stretched the bands are?

6forklike

You can also see the wood version has a lot more room for the completed section to grow. and the final bracelet is fine, if slightly looser than the loom version.

7forklike

I was looking at the domino box and had a brainstorm – I could build a fork-like loom on top of the slider lid, then there would be a bit of a storage area underneath!  Sort of. The lid is VERY thin, so I know I would need a thickness of wood UNDER it

8forklike

so the nails wouldn’t poke thru.  But that was going to interfere with the lid sliding in.  I just hacked away a bit of the side so it would slide

9forklike

but that compromises the storage cause stuff can slide out.  But it will hold a bag or two of loops so not perfect but not useless either.

12forklike

One thing about the cheap 99p nails – they are NOT all the same length.  I had one or two come thru the underneath piece of wood but I was able to add a bit of mount board to cove the tiny tip of the nails that did break thru.

You can see that this version had the nails row spaced closer than the block version.

11forklike

But I think it really could be even closer.  So long as the bands are slightly stretched that is all that is needed.  I like that the nails are long so you can clearly see which is the TOP loop when hooking off, for example, if you add the bands then slip them down the nail – you can have 5 or 6 levels and still see them all very clearly.

The solid base of the box will mean DD can use it with her one good hand and use her other one to stabilize it if she needs to, without needing to grip it.  I’ll maybe add a bit of felt to the bottom, or some non-slip mat stuff. I might even look at decorating it but not till I know this isn’t a momentary fad that she loses interest in a week.

My last task is to figure out a way to write out the visual pattern from the video for her so she can follow it on her own.  I think I can do that for some of them, ones with a couple of loads and hook offs, but not all of them  – the starburst one above has 12 steps for each burst, so perhaps too complex for her. We’ll see.  She might be able to watch the video and follow along but I’m not sure.  The fishtail one you can see in the top photo is actually only a couple of steps – I may start with that one….

So a little more involved that taping two forks together, and a bit bigger, but overall, I think it is a success.  DD will let me know if it is or not….

 


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A variety of things all came together…

Let’s start with a paper pack.  DD is so sweet.  When out shopping with her Dad on day she spotted this paper pack in the store and exclaimed immediately that she HAD to buy it for me.

Well, it isn’t REALLY my style, but I could never tell HER that.  Problem is, every so often she asks me if I have made something with it yet.  I thought I had better do so pretty soon so she would know that I liked it and that she had made a good choice.  The things we do for our kids…. The one thing about this paper is it’s fairly thin weight – ,far to thin to create a card from, but perfect for covering slightly thicker card.

Then, when compiling the BlogBits section for the UKS HomePage I came across this tutorial from on of our sponsors, A Trip Down Memory Lane.  They did a Cyber Crop in July and I what collecting links and was quite taken with this little Twisted Card. I thought it was a cute way to make a holder for a gift card.  DD had been invited to a birthday party and when I asked the Mom what sort of thing the birthday girl might like, was told a gift card would be perfect. So a gift card holder was in order.

That really does seem to be the done thing nowadays.  When DS was young I would have NEVER give money or a gift card – it was all about finding the perfect gift  and DS was as excited to shop for it as we hoped the birthday person would be to get it.  But after getting three copies of Artemis Fowl and at least two copies of Coraline (in addition to the one I bought him) I can see the sense of it.

So we have three things all colliding – the paper stack, the twisted card tutorial, and the need for a gift card holder.  It would have been easy to just make the card, but you know me.  I always have to put a spin on things, and I did with this as well.

The tutorial calls for a 4 x 12 inch piece of paper, scored on the diagonal. I began with an A4 sheet of fairly light card, the Text & Graphics card from Staples that is 160 GSM.  I found thicker card didn’t fold very well.  I cut at 4 1/2 inches lengthwise. That makes it about 11 3/4 inches but it really didn’t matter.

I punched with a border punch all along one edge, but started the punch about 1/4 inch or so in, not right to the edge.

2twistedcard

When I scored it diagonally I didn’t score to the CORNER but to just past the punched area, like so:

3twistedcard

4twistedcard

This just makes the fold along the card and not thru the punched area.

5twistedcard

You will have to trim off the tiny overhang – how much and how you trim it will depend on what punch you used.

6twistedcard

Now you simply carry on with the tutorial, scoring and folding the card in half. If you want a border around the patterned paper you use to cover, the templates in the PDF work OK, although the border is bigger than you might like.

7twistedcard

If you shift the templates away from the edge, and carry the cutting along the same lines, just extending it, you can get a bigger piece to cover and thus a thinner border

8twistedcard

To be honest I found it easier, once the card was folded, to just unfold it and cover the areas the trim the overhang to fit.  That also meant I could play around with the position.  Given the odd skew to the card, paper with straight lines don’t look straight when you add them along an edge.

10twistedcard

See? The green was added along the diagonal.  For the inside, it was butted up to the bottom, inside the fold.

11twistedcard

Can you see that you can have the punched edge along the OUTSIDE of the card or along the INSIDE pocket, depending on how you fold it?

12twistedcard

For this edge to edge cover, it’s easier to fold the card diagonally then cover the areas with the paper THEN punch.  I didn’t step-by-step that cause I punched, then covered, then re-punched on this one.  For MOST of them I covered the base but leaving the punched area plain cardstock, like these:

Again, you can see the big scallop card and the most finished one have the punched edge along the outside of the card, but the lacy one has a plain front, and the punched edge is inside, along the diagonal.  I thought these would be quite cute not only for gift cards but for the Grandparents, or cousins, with a photo stuck in the pocket created by the diagonal fold. Maybe you can JUST see it in the lacy edge one?

Most pf these are not finished-finished, just mostly done to keep on hand.  Cards of this size fit a 6 1/4 x 4 1/2 envelope so that’s handy!

And best of all when DD gets home today I can show her I used that paper pack – it’ll make her day.

While making them I had another idea but that will have to wait for tomorrow….