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Gelli print wallpaper?

I mentioned a week or so ago that DD wanted to redecorate her room.  With her learning difficulties, she doesn’t always understand when I try to explain to her why something is maybe not the best idea.  Trying to let go a bit I made the mistake of telling her she could pick the adhesive wallpaper border for her new room.  She picked a sideways stripe.  Ugh. In BROWN. Double Ugh.  And as this is quite an old house, there are no walls that are square and true.  Somehow the stripes just made that stand out.  So I had the idea of cutting out some circles from the remains and then of getting a sample of a nicer border and cutting out some circles from that.  Applying them 1/2 on 1/2 off the stripes it really made the whole thing just a bit more fun and funky.

Why am I telling you this? Well in the end I had just a bit of the border left so I went ahead and cut some circles.

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First,  I gave them a coat of Gesso to give it some tooth

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Then a coat of white acrylic paint to better hide the pattern. This was pretty faint anyway and covered easy.

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Then I printed on them. I just addd some temp adhesive to the liner on the back, the bit that gets peeled off, and stuck them to printer paper, to make the printing easier.

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Then I stamped on them.

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Now I can add them to my craft room wall for a bit of instant decor.  As they are meant to peel off without damaging the walls (although our walls have revolting textured covering – I am pretty sure it’s called “pebble dash” and that looks exactly as yo would expect it to look) I know after the third or fourth border change in DDs room, it DOES strip off the paint if there are cracks in the plastering. Also if you are one to wash your walls, I certainly would put a coat of Mod Podge or the like over it, so you don\t sweep over it and somehow transfer the paint to the walls.

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I know here in the UK most stores have an open roll so you can tear off a chunk to take home.  If you want to do 50 of them and decorate your whole room, I would say buy a roll.  If you just want to do 10 or so, you may be OK with just a sample.  And frankly, you could do the same with lots of different arty techniques – just be aware of them.  If the kids get into a water gun fight in the lounge, you are heading for  a disaster if you used Distress ink LOL!

Now, with the 6 x 6 inch plate, I don’t know if I could do, for example, a whole border – the prints would have t be side by side, maybe slightly overlapped, but even so I think the “join” would be pretty obvious, even with a very limited colour palette and maybe some stamping to try to hide it.  The circles (or whatever shape you can cut) add a bit of interest without being overwhelming.  But you could do a whole BUNCH of circles, as if they were a border.  Just mark a line with painter’s tape, scatter the circles above, on, and below, overlapping a few, etc. till you have the effect you want.

I’m not sure if doing a recipe card for this is worth it – it may be of limited appeal and I hate to make people print a set of two when is something they will never do. So should I make this one and hold off for another oddball technique to match it with? Find something else to mate with the Ombre one I did?  DOH!


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Gelli Print 2014 CD Calendar

Before I went off on the Word Search tangent, I was planning on making a Gelli print calendar.  I finally made the time to play around with the idea.  I’ll work on it, now I know what’s what, over the next couple of days and show the completed project when I get done.

Here is the process, as well as some options, and pointers to things I think work well and others not so well.

The first thing I did was alter a previous calendar printable.  MANY of the ones I have made, as well as many you can find with a quick Google search for CD calendar printable will work very well for the.  Click the menu item at the top for Calendar Making to see links to most of mine.  The PDF of this one is here.

The printed calendar part is sized so it can be covered perfectly with a standard Post-It note.

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Keep in mind that although I am playing with Gelli prints, the same idea can easily be used with many stamping techniques, using inks or sprays to colour the background instead.

There are two methods to do this.

Method 1 – Print then Pull

For this version, first print all the calendar sheets and cut them in half, one month per 1/2 sheet.  Add a Post-It not over the area you want to remain un-printed. Pull the print.  I played with light-first, darker-over combos, but really any sort of print, so long as the text area is masked, should work without compromising the readability.

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Overprint if you like, then when dry, pull off the Post-It note to reveal your calendar “page”

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The masked are will remain plain cardstock, and I like this for how clear and readable the information is.

Method 2 – Pull then Print

Pull prints on an A4 (US letter should work as well) piece of cardstock.  Think READABILITY and pick a fairly light colour and an overall pattern.  I find bubble wrap my favourite for this. I tried a light yellow and pulled the first full-strength print as well as the ghost print for an even lighter version.

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I have only the 6 inch plate which is perfect to get two more or less equal sized prints to a sheet.  If you have a larger plate, I would maybe mask 1/2 the sheet and pull your first one, then mask that and pull the other, rather than pulling a full-page, unless you have a plan for the unused half. But you can do as you like, of course!

I’ve proved in past projects that printing on a pulled print works perfectly well, at least with my Canon printer.  Test your own inks and see to be sure, before you do a load of them and find it smears.

Print the calendar sheet onto the pulled print. I think both the light and dark versions are clear, although the light is maybe slightly more so.

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Now mask the text area then pull your print to get more colour and pattern. I ALSO pulled a print without masking.  I think you will agree that is not very readable – or maybe you like that better,  Again, up to you.

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Here are the two – masking the text:

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NOT masking the text.

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And all four, to help you compare:

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They will fit a standard CD case for using as a desk calendar, but that is just one thing you could do.  You can print the PDF four images per page to get quite a small print, if you wanted to pull a print over the whole page – that will give you pages that are about 2 1/2 inches, but the Gelli Print part around the edges will be pretty small, less than 1/2 inch around the text.  Personally I’m not sure that is worth doing, not for a Gelli print.  But if you wanted to make plain tear-off calendars that would be the way to do it.

I think making a frame for the CD case, like I did with some Gelli debris here, would be nice. Just make the opening as wide as you can to show off the prints on the pages.

I made a little foam-core frame and covered it with used and colourful paper tools!

I made a little foam-core frame and covered it with used and colourful paper tools!

Now I know the method, I just have to complete the rest of the pages.

One last idea – You can always print the calendar pages then cut them out and mount them onto a Gelli print and use up some of your prints that way.  That is by far the easiest and most predictable  way to get something you know you will like.  But isn’t part of the fun of the Gelli plate the whole surprise/random aspect of pulling prints?

I’m keen to experiment with the circle calendar myself, or masking the text with a circle rather than a square…..