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Printables, and a near-fail book

I will begin by adding some printables that I made last week, before I got sidetracked by bookmaking.

textstrips

I think looking at the PDF on my monitor, the text looks fuzzy. I’ve printed them to test for myself and they are actually fine.  There are strips for a 6×4 photo (along the 6″ or 4″ edge) and the 4″ inch ones also fit a 3×4 inch photo or filler card. There are some 3″ ones too.  Just little label-maker style text strips that you might find useful. Grab them here.

Now continuing the bookmaking adventure, I did try the rectangular labels.  Not a total fail but not a total success either.  First, an annoyance.  I was quite pleased with the paper booklet that came as a gift with Crafts Beautiful. Cute patterns, mostly, double-sided and a nice weight for the map folds, not too bulky.

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Then I opened it.  WTF?

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Printed right on the paper!  DOH. Careful placement of the dies just barely worked

grandlabels4book

Some of the edges look a little nibbled.  The real problem is that there is a formula for doing the map fold on a rectangle.  Width – Height / 2 (width of paper across minus the height of the paper divided by 2)  and that number is where you would mark for your diagonal score lines.  But because of  the shaped edges I was struggling to get it right.  Technically that is 9 1/2 wide minus 6 high = 3 1/2 divided by 2 = 1 3/4 inches.  But every time I did it, it seemed to fold just slightly differently.  And sometimes the folds had to be adjusted so the finished unit had neat edges.

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I found doing one side perfectly then adjusting the other so the points matched, worked best.  And making a template for the point to fold the side in to helped as well.

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The construction is pretty much the same, although I made the covers from the biggest size (same as the pages) then the inner cardstock dividers from the next size down.  It made for an interesting book.

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Go back to the previous posts here and here for more detail on the map-fold books. This post talks about folding directional papers.

I am madly folding pop-up boxes, from my better designed .svg, to finish off the handful of ATCs before Wednesday.  Bank holiday tomorrow and we may actually get out for the day, so doing laundry too.  Blech. After spending the entire day disassembling DS’s Stompa bed OMG! what a job) and filing a mountain of paperwork, and prepping an enormous amount of  meat for the BBQ (enough to last the week for sure) and to populate the new freezer, I could use a day out….


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Folding the inserts (map fold book)

I’ve already explained the map fold, so this is more to save yo ruining a piece of paper yo want to use by making a wrong fold. Firstly, look at how hugely different the labels die cut can be folded.

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I suppose you could make a case for both versions being useful, but the one on the right (in the bottom photo, left in the top one) is the one that offers the most useable space, I think.  That is the one I will explain.  You can make the other version by just switching the bump and point folds. I trust you can identify a bump and a point….

foldunits

1. Begin by folding the piece in half, two bumps together.

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then fold the other two bumps together, keeping the mountain folds on the same side

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2. With the mountain fold on the inside, fold in half, matching the points.

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Matching the mountain folds of the point-to-point fold, collapse the unit. You will end up with this:

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3.  Fold in the sides, keeping the top of the fold as level as you can, leaving just a smidge of a gap in the middle

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and fold the reverse side to match.

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4.  This is the tricky reverse-the-fold bit.  

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Unfold each fold, and reverse the centre fold so the bump is inside.

5. Done.

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The trick with paper that has an actual directions, that needs to be seen right side up, is to orient the paper correctly to begin with.

directional

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Make sure the single point to point fold goes top to bottom

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It only looks wrong – the flat (unscored) areas are the “pages” where the unit is stuck inside the book base.

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I am going to add the PDF of the shaped areas, without the poem, as it is more useful and no one really expressed any interest in having the with-text version.

boybookblanksYou can easily create the sized text blocks and print them then stick the cut out bits over the test and print again.

Have fun!  You know, I have a set of rectangular brackets as well –  I wonder….

 

{wink}

 


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Construction of the Map Fold Books

This post has the potential to be excessively long.  I am going to break it up into a couple of posts to keep that from happening.  Also, I am off out very soon.

So without further ado, here is the basic construction.

1. The book base is constructed of three folded sections.  The measurements for the one I will show are

two 4 x 8 inch pieces of cardstock, scored and folded in half

one 12 x 4 inch piece, scored at 4 inches, 8 inches, and 8 1/2 to 8 3/4 inches.  This will create a fold over flap so the thickness of the book  will determine the size.  This should help:

bookbase

 

2. Stack the pieces and carefully punch five evenly spaced holes thru the centre folds

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and sew together with a 5-hole pamphlet stitch.  This is the image I go back to over and over again when I forget!

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That is the basis for all of the books.  The inserts for THIS one begin with not a square, like normal, not a circle, like my previous variation, but with a large bracket, cut with the Spellbinders Grand Nestabilities, Grand Labels One.

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To add the pages, stick one side of the folded unit to the left (or right) page.

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Add adhesive to the other side – I usually don’t cover the whole face bit focus on the centre line and the straight bits on the sides

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Fold over the next page, making sure the corners are lined up, and press to stick.

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Ta dah!

You can close the book with a simple ribbon or cord tie, like I did the previous sample

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or add a two-button wrap, or any other closure you fancy.

In the next post I will talk about folding the pages from the label – there are a few tricks to it, especially with directional paper – and share show I added the text.  I should be able to share that as a PDF so you can print and cut, rather than taking the time it took ME to set it all up.  Here’s a sneaky peek:

The file looks like this:

boybook1

 

I do also have a sheet with the shapes, but blank, so you can add your own text.  The print looks like this:

insert

and the page looks like this!

photostoo

I’ll interject here that I know not everyone is going to have these big labels.  So if you want to see the printable file for a circle page or a square page, comment and let me know.  It’s a bit of effort but I think I can do it when I return if there is interest.  I may even go ahead and do What is a Girl? (also by Alan Beck) as well as I do have one of each!

 


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Hungarian Map Fold Book

So the bookmaking group I am on (pretty darn nearly the only thing that ever drives me to log in to Facebook) had a challenge for a Turkish Map Fold book.  You may recall I reposted quite an old PDF of instructions that had disappeared from the net. I’ve always like this fold, and had a bit of a play with it.  The book was cute enough, but I had to make another one so I could improve the construction.  As this is going to be VERY photo intense I’ll just show you the bare bones – a three-folds pamphlet with a flap.

TMP

The Turkish map folds are stuck two together and then stuck between each section. I’ll do another post about the construction but today I want to explain the HUNGARIAN map fold, a variation on this one, and my circular variation on that.

There is a great post here with the basic fold. That is for a square piece.  And don’t be fooled by the video that may pop up – it’s for the Turkish fold, not the Hungarian one. Although to be fair it is only one additional diagonal that differentiates the two, and by sticking the units so one piece is flat, mine really ends up being more Turkish than Hungarian LOL! But orienting the text is easier with the additional diagonal, I think.

Let me show you the finished  book first.  4hungarianmapfold

I would say e.e. cummings is my favourite poet and this one of my favourite poems. This is what the it looks like opened.

hungarianmapfold

but without the inserts. Unlike the Turkish one from yesterday, this one has only ONE insert between each section. The inserts are heavier weight than the graph paper so two would have made the book VERY thick.

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I’ll be showing you folding specifically for the placement of the text as well as folding a “diagonal” on a circle the only thing you need to know that the original linked page doesn’t cover.

1. I printed the text across the middle of pink graph paper.  

circlehungarianmapfold

Fold the circle in half bottom to top, across the text.  Use the lines of text to make sure the fold is straight across

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2. Open and fold, again with the text on the outside, in half side to side.  

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Flip it over.  It should look like this:

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3. Fold the diagonals by matching the fold lines.  This is the only tricky fold.

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4. Fold the second diagonal by matching the top and bottom fold lines of the first diagonal

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5. Collapse the piece.  It should want to collapse, if you’ve done the folds right.

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Note the orientation of the text.  You want the flat area to be the text area. Once collapsed it will look like this:

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6. Mark each unit at the same point – can you see the tiny dots?

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then fold in the side to meet the point.

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7. This sounds tricky but it isn’t.  REVERSE the folds so those triangle on the top switch to being INSIDE the unit.  Open them

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and push on that middle fold to push it inward

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Re-crease the folds.  It will change from the left image to the right one.

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And THAT is the circular Hungarian Map Fold. These inserts are just smaller units than the cardstock ones and the fit inside perfectly.  I didn’t go to any extraordinary lengths to get the units in exact proportion, I just made sure the marking and fold-in sides were similar, and that was good enough for them to nest nicely. I did stick them only in the very centre, which I think would help accommodate slight variations

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and yet they collapse fine.

nested

 

I experimented with a number of circle sizes and they all seem to nest nicely.

It would make a nice card too, just one fold.

I think it’s just a pretty little book.  I also think the flat areas that hold the text could easily hold photos and you could add journaling or other text to the smaller folded areas by the print/cut/stick method, or hand write it if yo prefer the circles open up relatively flat.  Well, dang.  Now I have to make  a photo one too.  Argh.  Maybe I’ll photo that for a step-by step for the construction…

{sigh}

And I can do the straight Turkish fold on a circle and see if it really is the same (minus the extra diagonal) and if it matters.

Jeez.  I am so out of practice for these tutorial sorts of posts.  I’ll try to be more concise for the next one,  just need to get my groove back.

And finish those last few ATCs before Wednesday!

 

 

 


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Comment driven tutorial – PDF edits

I’ve mentioned it before, but as I had a specific request for editable PDFs, I wanted to take a moment to show the example the anonymous commenter asked for, demonstrated with one of my printables that seems to match her needs. The comment said:

Just a thought, is it possible to make the PDFs editable e.g. if you wanted to personalise the quotations for someone? I noticed someone made something similar using circular calendar tags when wrapping a present and highlighted the person’s actual birthday which looked cool. That’s how I found your website – I was searching for a template (editable) ! xx

The program I use doesn’t create editable PDFs, like a Photoshop or PSE layers file.  As I create and share freebies, I’m not itching to have to buy something that does.  You can’t do it with the free Acrobat.  But there ARE tools that I know are in the Mac Preview program, and I would guess there must be something similar in the Windows version.  I SAY that, but I don’t always believe it LOL! which is why I use a Mac and not a PC. But in THIS case I feel pretty confident it has to be there.  If I show you how *I* do it, you will know what to look for and hopefully be able to do it. I’ll pop the steps for PSE on at the bottom so jump there if you have and use that.

The first thing is to open the PDF in whatever PDF viewer you have.  As I said, on a Mac, it’s Preview.  You MAY have to right-click OPEN WITH > Preview, if your default PDF viewer is Adobe.  I am using one of the circular calendars. I used the bigger one, but for tags, the smaller 4-to-a-page version might work better. And that post has a link for the Monday to Sunday version as well.  You decide.

1. Open the PDF and select the page you want to edit.   Either File > Save As > Give it a new name OR drag the page you want over onto the desktop so you don’t overwrite the original file.

pickpage

2.  You can see on the drop-down menus all the options

annotate

but clicking ANNOTATE in the top bar also brings up most of the tools in an icon bar in Preview.

bar

The oval can be used to create the circle, and a drop down menu lets you pick the colour of the circle.  The box with the A in it adds the text and the font window can be opened from that to pick the font, size, and colour.

I rotated the page so it was easier to work on without getting a crick in my neck.  You can rotate back to print.

3.  Edit to add what you like.  For this example, the Happy Birthday message and the date circled.

edittoadd

I would just print the sheet then punch or cut the circle out, punch a hole and tag done. Close without saving if you edited the original rather than dragging the page or duplicating the file!

You could instead use the circle as a card topper for a QUICK card that looks like it was a lot of effort but isn’t.

Other ideas?  Maybe use the arrow tool instead of the circle.  Or edit the month for a special day (Mother’s day, Christmas, Valentines Day) and highlight the date.  Copy just that month onto a blank sheet (use the SELECT tool and Copy > Paste) to make a sheet full of circles for multiple cards or tags

Editing PDFs in Photoshop Elements

I’ve done similar before, but I know people struggle sometimes to translate generic instructions into specific tasks so I’ll go thru it again.

1. Open the PDF in Photoshop Elements.  If it is a multi-page PDF you can only open a single page.

psepdf

It’s hard to see but page 3 is slightly highlighted with a black border.  Clicking OK opens that page only. PSE also rasterizes the file.  Google it if you care.  In the top menu bar, FILE > DUPLICATE THE single PAGE AND CLOSE THE ORIGINAL PDF so you don’t mistakenly ruin the original.

2. Zoom in on the item you want to edit. Add a NEW LAYER with the Layers menu.  Using the marquee tool (the “marching ants” over November 19th) draw your selection on the new layer.  (You can also use the circle SHAPE (there at the right) if you prefer – just drag it over. It’ll be too big probably, but it will be created on its own layer.  FREE TRANSFORM IT to change the size. I just think it’s easier the other way)

addcircle

 

Usually the STROKE option will be active, but to capture the screen grab it isn’t. You can make it bigger or smaller, and pick your colour.

stroke

 

 

3. Add the text box, select and type your text.

text

 

 

addtext

Print.  You don’t even need to save it if you aren’t going to use it again and again.

Personally, I think the tools in Preview are far easier.  If someone who has a PC knows how to do what I did on the Mac, do share.  I make pick DH or DS’s brain.  They both use PCs a bit and might be able to help.

I really should so a workflow capture of the process but when I do I always mess up if it is a longer process. I’ll experiment.  If I can work it out I’ll do a Quicktime movie and share.  Then I only have to sort out a mic for the Mac.  <sigh>

 

 


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Make your own stamping plate

There has been a discussion on UKS about stamp+die sets.  The dilemma is to cut the paper or card THEN stamp the image or stamp the image and THE place the die to cut it out.  Last I looked I am not sure if one method was winning over the other.  But that discussion prompted a discussion of stamping plates – Fiskars has one (and I have that one, or did till I stepped on it and broke off a corner – DOH!)

P1050965

and it seems there is a Martha Stewart one too – or at least a block with foam feet.

You know me – if I have a hankering for something but neither the time nor the cash to get it, I am always going to try to figure out how to make something similar from stuff I have hanging around the house.

What I used:

makestampplate

an acrylic block – this is one of the big chunks a mate cut for me, that I have used previously as a stamp mount for my Gelli plate. But any large acrylic stamp mount will  work – I got these from a craft show – maybe £10 for nine.  The larger ones are best

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a strip of cork tile – I don’t see why Fun Foam wouldn’t work as well, one thickness or two stuck together.  You’ll have to play with it.  You just need something to make the stamp hit the paper fully, compensating for the foam.  When compressed it will be close to flush with the table but the little extra helps.

a Sharpie marker – to draw grid lines on the acrylic.  Not required, but it may help with placement and act like a positioner

a bathroom sponge – has to be the easily compressed foam, not cellulose sponge, for example.  You might find this sort of foam as kids foam stamps.  That’ll save you cutting them.

And speaking of cutting – I cut them with my Big Shot and a thick die, but you can just cut them in squares with scissors.

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I thought this very thick sponge was TOO think so I cut the circles in half thru the middle

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I stuck them to the corners of the block

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and covered the gluey bit you can see thru the block with fun foam circles – totally not required. I used Fabri-tac, which held the foam perfectly to the acrylic.  Not sure what will happen if I ever try to WASH is, but I’m not planning on doing that – likewise the Sharpie lines.  they don’t seem to wipe off with a baby wipe so they might last,

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I cut the cork tile so it fit between the foam feet

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You can see what I mean about the cork or Fun Foam making up the difference.  Add the stamp.

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just flip it over the paper and press

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See? The stamp would be too far from the paper for a good impression without the cork.

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and a perfect image!

11makestampplateI think you could add smaller foam bits to ANY block – you can still use the other side as a normal mount then flip it over to use the foam as feet if you need to.  But the point is, it took 10 minutes and I didn’t have to buy anything.  OK so the sponge was bought for another purpose, but it was 45p so not going to break the bank, now is it?

Off to work on the memory book a bit more.  Enjoying it, but I’ll be glad when I’m done…


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A variety of things all came together…

Let’s start with a paper pack.  DD is so sweet.  When out shopping with her Dad on day she spotted this paper pack in the store and exclaimed immediately that she HAD to buy it for me.

Well, it isn’t REALLY my style, but I could never tell HER that.  Problem is, every so often she asks me if I have made something with it yet.  I thought I had better do so pretty soon so she would know that I liked it and that she had made a good choice.  The things we do for our kids…. The one thing about this paper is it’s fairly thin weight – ,far to thin to create a card from, but perfect for covering slightly thicker card.

Then, when compiling the BlogBits section for the UKS HomePage I came across this tutorial from on of our sponsors, A Trip Down Memory Lane.  They did a Cyber Crop in July and I what collecting links and was quite taken with this little Twisted Card. I thought it was a cute way to make a holder for a gift card.  DD had been invited to a birthday party and when I asked the Mom what sort of thing the birthday girl might like, was told a gift card would be perfect. So a gift card holder was in order.

That really does seem to be the done thing nowadays.  When DS was young I would have NEVER give money or a gift card – it was all about finding the perfect gift  and DS was as excited to shop for it as we hoped the birthday person would be to get it.  But after getting three copies of Artemis Fowl and at least two copies of Coraline (in addition to the one I bought him) I can see the sense of it.

So we have three things all colliding – the paper stack, the twisted card tutorial, and the need for a gift card holder.  It would have been easy to just make the card, but you know me.  I always have to put a spin on things, and I did with this as well.

The tutorial calls for a 4 x 12 inch piece of paper, scored on the diagonal. I began with an A4 sheet of fairly light card, the Text & Graphics card from Staples that is 160 GSM.  I found thicker card didn’t fold very well.  I cut at 4 1/2 inches lengthwise. That makes it about 11 3/4 inches but it really didn’t matter.

I punched with a border punch all along one edge, but started the punch about 1/4 inch or so in, not right to the edge.

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When I scored it diagonally I didn’t score to the CORNER but to just past the punched area, like so:

3twistedcard

4twistedcard

This just makes the fold along the card and not thru the punched area.

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You will have to trim off the tiny overhang – how much and how you trim it will depend on what punch you used.

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Now you simply carry on with the tutorial, scoring and folding the card in half. If you want a border around the patterned paper you use to cover, the templates in the PDF work OK, although the border is bigger than you might like.

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If you shift the templates away from the edge, and carry the cutting along the same lines, just extending it, you can get a bigger piece to cover and thus a thinner border

8twistedcard

To be honest I found it easier, once the card was folded, to just unfold it and cover the areas the trim the overhang to fit.  That also meant I could play around with the position.  Given the odd skew to the card, paper with straight lines don’t look straight when you add them along an edge.

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See? The green was added along the diagonal.  For the inside, it was butted up to the bottom, inside the fold.

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Can you see that you can have the punched edge along the OUTSIDE of the card or along the INSIDE pocket, depending on how you fold it?

12twistedcard

For this edge to edge cover, it’s easier to fold the card diagonally then cover the areas with the paper THEN punch.  I didn’t step-by-step that cause I punched, then covered, then re-punched on this one.  For MOST of them I covered the base but leaving the punched area plain cardstock, like these:

Again, you can see the big scallop card and the most finished one have the punched edge along the outside of the card, but the lacy one has a plain front, and the punched edge is inside, along the diagonal.  I thought these would be quite cute not only for gift cards but for the Grandparents, or cousins, with a photo stuck in the pocket created by the diagonal fold. Maybe you can JUST see it in the lacy edge one?

Most pf these are not finished-finished, just mostly done to keep on hand.  Cards of this size fit a 6 1/4 x 4 1/2 envelope so that’s handy!

And best of all when DD gets home today I can show her I used that paper pack – it’ll make her day.

While making them I had another idea but that will have to wait for tomorrow….

 


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That Black Magic technique, updated

I am always surprised when an old post of mine all of a sudden keeps getting views and pinned, and I get questions that I can’t answer cause it’s been SO LONG since I did the original thing. This post is getting hit hugely. I did that back in 2012 so I hope I can be forgiven for being a little fuzzy on the details LOL!

I decided I should go back and do the technique again and try a few other variations.  Luckily (?) the power was out AGAIN today so I had plenty of time to play.

So let’s begin.

I thought I would try

  • the black acrylic paint
  • Archival ink
  • Memento ink
  • Pigment ink

The process is pretty much the same to begin with, then there are some options.

1. ALL – Smudge on your Distress ink to create areas of colour

2blackmagictechnique

2. ALL – let it dry COMPLETELY or blast it with the heat gun.  Distress ink stays wet for a bit and will grab the embossing powder if you rush this step.

3. ALL – stamp with Versamark or other clear embossing ink then sprinkle on clear (ideally DETAIL) embossing powder, depending on your stamp.

4. ALL – Heat emboss and let cool

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5.  ACRYLIC PAINT – using something smooth, like Cut ‘N Dry foam (can’t find mine, used a make-up sponge, and that is NOT as smooth) spread the black paint over the entire area.  You can let it dry and cover it again if any inked areas peep thru.

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6. ACRYLIC PAINT – with a slightly dried out baby wipe, daub off the paint from the embossed areas, revealing the trapped Distress ink under the embossing. DO NOT use a super wet wipe, and DO NOT rub hard.  You will take off too much of the paint.

5blackmagictechnique

This is pretty much exactly as described in the original post.

5A. ARCHIVAL INK – smudge Archival Ink over the entire area.  You will find this easier (I suspect) if your ink pad is new and juicy.  Mine is older so I struggled to get a deep,rich, black cover.

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6A. ARCHIVAL INK – burnish off the Archival ink from the embossing.  Harder than it sounds.  I tried using the clean area of the make-up sponge, It worked OK but not great.

Then I tried a damp baby wipe.  Better,  but still the Distress Ink below the embossing wasn’t bright like with the paint.

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Then I tried a wetter wipe and it took away some of the ink on the background as well.  Here you can see the difference between the Archival Ink and the Paint.

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5M. MEMENTO INK – again, smudge the Memento ink all over the surface.  This was a background stamp so the areas to grab the ink were smaller.

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6M. MEMENTO – I almost didn’t need to bother burnishing off the ink.  Just the rubbing of the ink over the embossed areas with the make-up sponge removed any ink from the embossing.  The Memento is grabbed by the background card only.  So perhaps the EASIEST, but check out the next shot – even with the different sorts of stamps, I hope you can see the Memento isn’t super dark and rich.

10blackmagictechnique

again, it COULD be my slightly tired ink pad.  I would expect Versafine to work in a similar way.

5P. PIGMENT INK – this worked a treat.  Smudged on the ink with a Colorbox teardrop, direct to paper.

11blackmagictechnique

Nice and dark, good cover.  Some hint of the Distress Ink showing thru but a 2nd coat maybe would help.

6P. PIGMENT INK – I just knew that a wet wipe was the wrong way to go with this so I didn’t even try – I used a finger wrapped in dry paper towel to rub off the pigment ink. I did this while it was still slightly damp.  If it were super dry (and pigment ink takes a while to dry!) a very very slightly damp wipe might be OK.

12blackmagictechnique

 

Really, that doesn’t do it justice.  The pigment ink is deep and dark, and the trapped Distress Ink is brighter than it looks.  Still not as bright as the PAINT version, but better than the Archival and almost as good as the Memento.

7. ARCHIVAL and PIGMENT ink – sandwich the piece between two sheets of paper – I used an old graph paper tablet – and iron off the embossing powder.  It will melt and get sucked into the paper

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and when you remove the paper…

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WOW.  Totally POPs.  Trade off is that the raised embossing from the clear powder is gone, so it looks more like plain old stamping, although you do get a bit of a halo effect on the edges, which is nice.  But colour-wise it’s pretty close to the brightness and intensity of the paint version, even if the black isn’t as nice for the ARCHIVAL version.

Not sure how to rank them, frankly.  The best technique is the one you have all the stuff for already LOL!  But in terms of cost, I suspect the PAINT is the cheapest (paint is dirt-cheap compared to an ink pad.)

In terms of fewest steps to get the best colour. I would say PAINT is the winner – with Memento closely behind if your ink pad is new and dark.

I think Pigment ink is closer to OK than not, stopping after rubbing off the ink, but better than Archival by a mile.

Then with an extra step and a flatter result, Pigment Ink and Archival are both good in terms of COLOUR when you iron off the embossing, but Pigment ink gives a better BLACK coverage.

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As ever, YMMV.  I really do think there are a lot of variables – how dark and juicy your ink pad is, how light, or heavy your hand when doing the wipe-off, how damp/wet your wipe is…. But overall I had forgotten how pretty this can look.

I’ll make a PDF of the post, although it’s the quick-and-dirty Readability version, so it requires me to post it first and then do the process, and come back to add the link.  If THIS BIT is hot (clickable) then it’s there and you can download it.  If not come back and it will be in bit.

And luckily, just before the power went out, I had printed a little spiky guy that I edited to include a bit of art.  DS is a fan of Nujabes (Japanese hip-hop artist, now sadly deceased) so I made him this little desk-top pal. Just for fun.

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I’ve finally worked out the best order to stick the bits to ensure the ears are nicely curved.  I haven’t folded the feet yet and may not, in case DS prefers the feet flat so you can see the sneakers….

 

 


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AJ technique – a twofer

Perplexed by that title?  Don’t be.  I’ll explain….

Sort of a Buy one, Get one free technique.  I was looking at my last page, at the bits of book paper I used as the base, and wondering about the waste when I trim off the overhang.  Silly, I know, but it came to me that I could intentionally leave MORE overhang, and use it for the next page.

It take a little thought – only in the sense that you need to plan if for a page that has nothing already on the flip side.  what I did was prep a LEFT hand page that was blank on the back and not intended to be part of a two page spread, with Gesso. My thoughts are that with the book paper base on the reverse, I don’t really need to cover BOTH sides with book paper. Nor did I need to coat both sides with Gesso…

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Once that was totally dry I flipped back to the reverse and started layering on the book paper.

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I thought I would leave the white border on the book pages and make sure THAT was the overhang bit, cause I had an idea for THAT too – but I’ll save that for another day…

Once the reverse of the Gessoed page was covered and dry…

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all I did was flip to the reverse and folded the overhang onto the page.

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Rather than stick those flaps down around the edges, I thought it might work better if I complete THAT page and THEN stick them down.  That leaves me the option, if I stop here, of sticking them, and adding gesso over them to incorporate them into the background of the page OR of completing the page then sticking them for a stronger “border” statement, IYKWIM.

Thinking I might find the loose flappy bits annoying I took the extra step to tape them down with artists tape, for easy removal

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and leaving me with a flat page to work on while completing the reverse page.

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I suppose a third option might be to work on the page with the flaps as applied, decorating the whole thing, flaps and all, so you wind up with a decorated border when you eventually DO flip them to the reverse, but then you have to consider if they will “match” the reverse page too, or plan for that page at the same time.  Frankly that takes too much forward thought for a Monday morning…


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More about pencil eraser stamps and placement

I still have DS in town (and still a list of things to do for him before he heads back, mostly clothing repair – you see? I just KNEW there was sewing in my future, I just hoped it would be quilting!) and DD is home sick from school, so this is just another quickie.

Following on from yesterday, I did eventually find my larger size punchinella.   I just KNEW the size was perfect to use as a guide for stamping a uniform pattern with the tiny eraser stamps, and I was right.

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The width of my punchinella is about 3 1/2 inches, but it is very very easy to reposition and carry on.  Even so, just a 6 inch (measured from one full circle to another full circle) length produces a grid of 3 x 6, which would still work widthwise for many cards.

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LOL!  My eraser carving is not expert but some of them I quite like.  Remove the punchinella and…

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I must have gotten a smudge of brown on the side of my finger cause there are some smudges there, but as this is a sample it doesn’t really matter much.  But it does show you the idea. Personally I think it’s a lot easier than drawing a grid, and a lot more reliable than eyeballing it. And you could perhaps pick out different patterns – I can see how you might make an arrow, or a chevron or straight lines or triangles…

But not a circle.  But as I mentioned yesterday,  other stencils work as well.  Not sure who makes this one, but someone will recognize it, I’m sure.

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For the outermost ring of stamping, there is PLENTY of room.  For the next one in, it’s a close fit, so a stamp like I’ve used (the starburst one) works, but the other one wouldn’t – anything that depends on the full diameter of the eraser to show the pattern won’t work.  Maybe another similar stencil will?  Nothing I have carved fit the tiny holes of the smallest circle but just a dot from a bullet-tip marker works.

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I think I really need to store these pencils someplace where I won’t forget I have them.  I tend to do that.  Now back to laundry and sewing.