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Still slipping….

What a weird day it has been.  I have been carrying on with my slipped stitch sequences and testing out a few so-called jogless joins.  While they work OK for stripes, none work in a way I like for the slipped stitch helix knitting I am doing.  So far, adding one stitch and alternating between slipping it and knitting it looks best to me.  But I am now thinking maybe I add say three stitches, maybe even three stitches between the font and the back needles when working magic loop.  Sort of setting off the strips of the sequences by bands of solid colour – maybe in purl  or even twisted knits!  Purl, Ktbl, Purl is something that occurs in the Japanese stitch pattern I am using for a pair of socks at the moment and it looks interesting.

 

That would serve to set off the slipped stitch sections quite nicely, I think. I might have a go at that and see. It probably rather negates the value of the repeated sequence but only by inserting a break, rather than completely reworking the sequence (more on that later.)

OK but here is the weird thing.  I was mapping the patterns with coloured blocks, just to get an idea of some of the variations, and to see where they might differ.  All of these are actually assuming you are working in the round.  Here is a selection:

I noticed a couple of weird blocks, that made no sense to me.  Look at these:

The bottom one explains – the slipped stitches should be getting lighter and lighter with each slipping.  You can see that in all of these charts, you get a round of your sequence: Knit 4, Slip 1, but when you move to the next round in helix knitting, knitting in the second colour and slipping the stitch from the previous round, all the slips stack up.  What is stranger, for at least one of them, does not act like what I have always been told with regard to patterns.

Both 15 and 19 are multipes of 4 +3 stitches.

15 = 12 (= 4×3) + 3 stitches

19 = 16 (= 4×4) +3 stitches

And yet the charts are totally different.  Look back up to (k3, s1) on 15 or 19 stitches.  They look THE SAME.  Read any stitch dictionary – they all specify pattern repeats as “multiples of x, + y extra stitches” and 99.9% of the time, it works.  For this method it does not.  The true weirdness came when I tried to explain slipped stitch helix knitting to my husband.  OMG.  He just could not get it.  He eventually created his own little chart, I grabbed my knitted sample, I talked him thru the way knitting, and in particular SLIPPING when using two colours and alternating rounds, works.  He just kept saying “But if you just add another slip HERE you can make it work!” and I kept saying “But adding stitches makes it not a sequence!” and he would say “It IS a sequence, just not the same one!” and I would yell “LOOK AT THE BOOK! It is called SEQUENCE KNITTING! It has to be the exact same sequence, over and over. The clue is in the title!” and so we sent, round and round, making no progress.

So that has been my Saturday.  <sigh>

 


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Slip Stitch Sequence Knitting

Sometimes I get an idea and carry on with it, trying to see it to s good resolution, far past the time I think I really should give up on it.  I am not quite ready to say that I am at the end of this exploration yet, but I am close.  Even so I thought it was worth posting about it in case someone with a bigger more mathematical brain than me can make it work!

The book, Sequence Knitting, is one I got last year while in the US for a wedding.  Remember air travel? Weddings? Hugs from family? Yea. Well.

The concept is pretty amazing – knitting a “sequence” of stitches, let’s say (k4, p1) according to a set of rules (each row, in a serpentine way, or as a spiral) produces effortless, but amazing fabric.

I have been reading the book and looking at the samples for a very long time.  My hope was I could turn the patterns into socks.  But that wasn’t really working out for a variety of reasons.  The spiral sequences, which are the only ones that work in the round as true sequence knitting, are interesting but not amazing FOR SOCKS.  And I haven’t yet worked out a way to convert the serpentine versions into simple sequences – sure, you can make them two or more row patterns rather than repeating sequences but that rather defeats the point of it all!

I have made a few pair of socks from leftover yarn, using the helix knitting method, where you knit a round with one yarn then WITHOUT TWISTING you knit the next round with the second yarn.  I love the effect, especially with two self-striping yarns (that do NOT share a common colour) and it sparked an idea.

I wondered what might happen if rather than knit 4, purl 1 I instead did knit 4 SLIP 1, on alternating row helix style knitting?

Well, At first it seemed like magic! Check out these mosaic style patterns:

 

All of these were done in the round, alternating the light and dark blue.  All of them are pretty cool.  The key is doing the sequence on multiple of some number + additional stitches.  The only tricky bit (I thought at first) was to remember where you were in the sequence when rounding the magic loop – so if knitting (K5, S1) and you completed K3 on the back needle in light blue, the front needle had to begin with K2 in DARK blue.  That was easy enough to get into a rhythm with after a few rounds.

At some point, My brain went Well crap.  I am knitting a HELIX! I mean OF COURSE I am, but what are the implications of that?  That the rounds do not line up.  Nope, they sure don’t. In some sequences, it’s pretty rubbish.

In others you are aware something is not quite right but in similar colours or in fine yarn, it might not matter a lot if you place the beginning of round someplace that makes sense (the back of the neck of a cowl, maybe the back of a sock, etc)

And in reality it wasn’t too hard to come up with a way to make it more of a design feature – adding a single extra stitch at the beginning of the round that you slip on the alternate colour rounds and knit with the same colour gives you a sort of braided line of stitches dividing the helix beginning of round and end.

Not perfect, especially in these high contrast colours and in a small sample, but not horrible either.

So then I looked at it in different colours and I REALLY liked that effect a lot

But it just doesn’t seem like it will work for SOCKS, which was my initial goal.  The slipped stitch fabric is thick, even on sock weight yarn.  It draws the fabric in – not as much as stranded knitting does, but it does.  Maybe a hat would work, doing the slipped stitch after the brim and before the decreases for the crown (much like the hat patterns included in the book) as long as the divider stitches are something you can place at the back and be happy with, like the line of black stitches here

It might work on the cuff, say, of fingerless mitts, below the thumb gusset.

But in the end, I am not as wildly enthusiastic as perhaps I was when I did my very first sample.  Like I said, I am not quite done playing, because I still believe the simplicity of the sequence knitting is pretty darn nifty, the colour effect is likewise pretty nifty and the thickness of the fabric could be a benefit in certain situations.  I’d be super curious if anyone has thoughts on this – something blindingly obvious I missed? some method to match the helix better that I have not stumbled on? and ideas this concept sparks that are worth exploring?

Let me know!


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Another Nearly No-Sew Knitted Heart Pattern

I was keen to make another no-sew heart, with slightly different proportions and with a bit of texture.   It took me a few sample knits to get it to where I wanted it to be, but I am finally happy with the results. The original No-Sew Heart is very simple, a pair can be whipped out in and hour or two, if you do the two at a time, as you would socks. It looks like this:

I will add the NEW PDFs right at the beginning then get on with the explanation so I don’t get 100 comments or emails asking where they are!

The Nearly No-Sew Textured Heart

The Nearly No-Sew Subtle Textured Heart

The new, textured version has a few more rounds, and a few special tricks to make closing the gap in the middle a bit easier. Here are a couple of samples (the subtle version sample photo is right at the end):

 

 

On the last pattern I talked about the KFSB (knit front, slip back) alternative to KFB.  I explained how knitting into the front of the stitch, then inserting the needle into the back of that same stitch as if you were going to go ahead and knit into the back, but instead slipping that stitch over to the right  needle still produces two stitches but omits that little bar across the front you get with KFB. I offered the KFSB as an alternative to KFB, and said feel free to KFB if you prefer, it would be fine.

This one? Not so much. In order to make the pattern work, the increases need to be on the first and last stitch of the increase rows rather than one stitch in.  The KFSB give a far neater and snugger line of increases.

Can you see the KFB stitches (on the left) are just a little baggy and open?

This is the KFB seen along the edge – see the gaps above the “braid?”

and this is the KFSB seen along the edge – much tighter and neater!

I hope I have convinced you to give this a go!

One other small change.  When dividing for the heart bumps, in this version you will have an uneven number of stitches.  The round has 21 stitches and can’t be divided evenly.  This makes for a happy accident, I think.  When you begin heart bump #1, you will knit 10 stitches from the front needle, then slip on to waste yarn the heart bump #2 stitches.

You will move 11 from the second half of the front needle and then 10 from the beginning of the back needle. You will then begin heart bump #1 with a K2Tog, which brings the two halves together, beginning to close the gap.

Once you complete heart bump #1, and are ready to begin bump #2, you will need to join your yarn in the middle.  Re-organize your stitches so there are 10 stitches on the front needle and 11 on the back needle,  BUT you must then move the extra stitch in the middle from the BACK needle to the front, to then K2tog in the same way.

This seems like a bit of palaver but it helps to both simplify stitch pattern AND results in fewer sewn stitches needed to close the gap.

Now, I don’t have an issue stuffing the heart nicely thru the open bumps and the centre gap, but it IS easier if you fully stuff the tip and lightly stuff up to the gap then do bump #2 and finally fully stuff the bumps before you fully close the gap.

I was lucky enough to get a fellow Ravelry user, who knit the original, review the pattern and knit a sample.  I think her sample photos show the superior look of the KFSB along the side edge as well!

Many thanks to  MingleYarns  for her help. It is much appreciated!

As a bonus, there is yet another way to make this pattern that you might prefer.  The texture is more subtle, but if you hate purling then this will be better. All you need to do is read every PURL stitch as a KTBL (knit thru the back loop, or make a twisted knit stitch, as you prefer.)

With this very simple change, and making only knit stitches (well, sort of!) you get texture like this:

I went ahead and did a replace P with Ktbl  edit and created what I am calling A Nearly No-Sew Subtle Textured Heart Pattern.  Just know that that is quite literally the ONLY CHANGE in Subtle Textured vs Textured – just substituting a knit thru the back loop for a purl.

Lastly, if the proportions of the textured versions are more pleasing to you, you need only add 5 knit rounds after round 18 on the original No-Sew heart pattern.  The original is as streamlined as I could make it for charity knitting, but the textured versions (and the + 5 rounds version) are great for any other heart-as-gift.


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New cast on for socks?

I almost NEVER make cuff down socks.  But recently I did.  In the process, I think it may have created a new sort of cast on.  It is a variation on what I think is called the double tail long tail cast on (or at least some versions with that name) but it gives a super stretchy and (I think) very decorative edge that works great for 2×2 ribbing for cuff down socks.  I had a hunt on YouTube and found this video, which isn’t the same but shares some characteristics with mine. And the re-arranging of the strand around the thumb is done clearly, so that is probably helpful.

 

Here is a shot of the final effect of my variation:

But the effect is different in the reverse, so you can adjust to make the side you prefer the right side:

And you can see the amount of stretch it offers:

My mate from Yorkshire tells me this is now the only cast on she uses, but to be fair she is a wicked tight knitter!

The first thing you need to do is double the tail and make a slip knot near the yarn end:

Arrange your yarn as if to do a standard long tail cast on, making sure the yarn around your thumb is the SINGLE STRAND. This is where it deviates from the double strand LTCO. Like a normal LTCO you will scoop the single strand and take it over the thumb loop, over the double strand and back thru the thumb loop

This creates your first stitch, next to the slip knot.  I count the slip knot as a stitch.

Now, you have to reposition.  Release the thumb loop and make the single strand come across your palm and around your thumb from the back to the front, like so:

Scoop the lower strand that is across your palm, bring the needle over the double strand, and back thru the loop.

And that’s it.  You will have created a pair of double-stranded stitches like so:

And you can already see how stretchy they are.  Treat each doubled stranded stich as a single stitch – so the above, circled, is TWO stitches::

Join to work in the round, and work a 2×2 rib

If there is a drawback it is probably that this might be tricky to cast on two at a time – I’ve not tried it, so I don’t know!

I am not sure what to call it!  How about ukmaryanne’s very stretchy double strand long tail cast-on variation for 2×2 cuff down socks?  LOL!  I’ll work on it and see if I can wedge in 10 or so more words, or make an stupid acronym… ukmaryanne’s very unique LTCO alternative?  That makes it UVULA <snort>

I never have used the cast on from the video but it also looks interesting so I have to give that a go. Not so far as to knit another pair of cuff down sock, to be fair, but just to see how it’s end result differs from my end result.  Maybe it isn’t so unique after all!

On a completely different note, I have been watching the National Theatre production of Frankenstein and it is outstanding.  Interestingly it stars two Sherlocks – Benedict Cumberbatch, the BBC’s Sherlock and Jonny Lee Miller from Trainspotting but also Sherlock in the US tv show Elementary.  There is a lot of great stuff coming up, I think each is only available or a week.  I’m gutted I missed Treasure Island.


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Socks – less a pattern, more a guideline

Because I knit virtually all my socks toe-up, and with a Fish Lips Kiss heel, it is really quite easy to slot in any stitch pattern I want.  I have, goodness, maybe 6 or more books of stitch pattern, but my favourites are from Wendy Bernard.  I have The Knitting All Around one, the Up, Down, All Around one, and her Japanese stitches one.  I love that there re lists in the back that sort the various patterns by stitch count, so if I want to see all the patterns that match my usual 68 stitches count, I can do it.  It is also pretty easy to figure out how to add a couple of framing stitches and use most patterns that way.

I saw a stitch pattern called the Alternating Slip Stitch, and quite liked the way it looked. I felt like it might work well for hand-dyed yarn, and decided to give it a go.  after knitting a bit of a swatch, I decided to omit one line, which made the pattern created more round then oval.

One of my mates asked for the pattern, but there really isn’t a pattern, I just slot in the stitch sequence to my existing framework.  But I wrote up a little description for her, and having gone to the trouble to do that, I figured I might as well share it.

Here is another look at the socks:

I always like how a slipped stitch pattern breaks up colour pools in hand dyed yarn

Anyway, if you fancy the look here is the most basic outline of what I did. and just a little tip – I placed the stitch pattern info quite specifically on the PDF.  I like to use a little clip like these:

although to be fair a paper clip works just as well, on the side of the printout,  to keep track of where I am in the sequence.

I am already working on another pair, which I am really liking a LOT, but I feel like the stitch pattern might work even better if I shift it a few stitches tot he right to centre the design, or if I flip one sock so they are a mirror image.  Perhaps more on that at a later date.

 


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Now-Sew hearts in the round, two at a time

Because I made the mistake of hiding the link at the bottom the last time I posted about these No-Sew hearts, I am going to put it at the top this time!

Here is the pattern

A few places here in the UK have asked people from shielded households to knit pairs of hearts.  This is one post I saw on Facebook:

Hello everyone 😊 I was wondering if any knitters can help us! My ward at Wigan hospital are unfortunately looking after extremely poorly Covid positive pts. At the moment no visitors are allowed on the ward as it is obviously extremely high risk. It is devastating for us to watch someone suffer without their relatives around them – although they do have us and we try our best to hold their hand and provide the best support that we can ❤️💜💗💙 we are looking to trial an idea whereby we give our patients a knitted heart and send a matching knitted heart to their relative/next of kin. We are looking for people who can knit that have ideally been self isolating and had no contact with anyone who could possibly be infected to send pairs of knitted hearts to us and we can then distribute them to our patients and their loving relatives who cannot be with them. I really do believe it would be so comforting to our patients and their relatives in such sad times and I’m hoping that we can facilitate this with your help. Thank you so much for taking the time to read and please please share this to anyone you think could help.

Ince ward at Royal Albert Edward Infirmary
Wigan hospital
Wigan Lane
WN1 2NN

another is this one and this one.  I made a few (made quite a few more since I took this photo!)

Hubby is going out tomorrow for his once weekly shopping trip and he will be dropping these in the post on his way.

As I make another pair, I thought I would show that it is quite easy to make them two-at-a-time, in the round as well.

Just cast on both hearts. It’s only six stitches to begin with so easy peasy!

 

Knit up to the point where you off-load half the stitches to create the first heart bump then work just on the bumps till they are complete.

When you are finished, thread thru the ends but remember, DO NOT pull the end tight.  Y will be stuffing the heart thru the two openings. You might find it easier to do the last rounds to make the second heart bump by working on one heart at a time.  Up to you….

All done.

 

and stuffed!

Knitting two at a time you can knock out identical pairs pretty quick!


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It’s all about the knitting at the moment

I know I have been totally MIA here for a loooooonnnggg time.  Life has been pretty full.  The crafting I am doing is pretty much limited to knitting – something I can do in the car, in waiting rooms, while catching up on my endless film queues etc. I will also say the knitting is almost 90% socks.

I thought I would just do something I have been thinking of doing for a while, and that is using my blog to document those projects.

I made these a couple of months ago – the wool is from a bag we unearthed from under the table at my local knitting shop (very sadly soon to close) All Ewe Knit is Love in Shaftesbury.

This sock is using the pattern Slip Stitch Lines and is free on Ravelry.

I formed the sock-blocker from a coathanger, using the printable pattern here and the info here.

The heel is as nice a FLK heel as I have ever done.

And I have been experimenting with other versions, like a traditional slip-stitch version

and an Eye of Partridge version!

So that is what has been keeping me busy.  I am still also sending out 10-20 book folding pattern every week and a fair few DASH planners as well.  I may be back soon. But it’ll likely be a knitting post so papercrafters be warned!

 

 


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Still here. A bit about Dementia Dolls…

Settle in. This is a long one.

I am still here, just not up to much blogging.  Still sending out book folding templates, still knitting, not scrapbooking or doing much papercraft at all really.  Spent a day in A&E After Maddie shoved a pitchfork right thru her foot at the garden centre of her college. Fun.

But for my little bit of social interaction I pop over to the local Library every Friday morning for a couple of hours.  Mostly I knit there, and chat.  Jack is coming over from LA for a visit and he wants socks, so I worked out a way to knit 2 pairs of socks at the same time, at first on two circulars and then all four on one, once I no longer had to wrangle the 4 balls of yarn.  No photos, sorry, but I’ll probably do it again.

As part of the craft club, we had a presentation from the local Dementia UK group.  They needed Twiddle Muffs and we made lots of them.  The also showed a large, floppy doll and said that they would like a few of them as well, if anyone was so inclined.  No one really was but I like a challenge so I decided to make one.  The first one was done in the normal way, although I did abandon the complicated and all-in-bits pattern and adapted it to an in-the-round version.  She was sweet, but she’s gone now – again no photo. Again, sorry.

The Dementia lady came back the next week to find me.  She told me a lovely story about a woman in one of the care homes who has never been responsive, or engaged, and who has never spoken, since they have been visiting.  Apparently when she saw the doll she gasped and dashed right for it.  She grabbed it, hugged and cuddled it, then started singing it a lullaby while she rocked it.  She is much more engaged in the … meetings? Sessions, maybe, now that she has the doll.  I was asked very nicely if I could make another.

About this time I had gotten a couple of knitting machines.  Circular ones, that I thought would be helpful for twiddle muff making.

Finally, a photo!

I started with the toy one, then got the proper Addi, and at the same time ordered the Sentro via Amazon, but I suspect from China.  It was cheap, versus the Addi Kingsize (£30 vs £115!) None of them are EASY to use to make flat panels (the Sentro is best) but they all make pretty reasonable tubes. And fast. My plan had been to use up all my scraps of yarn to make the boring inside of the Twiddle Muffs then shift to needles to complete them with special stitches, odd yarn, beads, etc. Here are a few samples of the ones I’ve done.

I have a whole PDF on those which I may share at some point.

But then I thought I could possible use them to make Dementia Dolls if I took a minute to think about it.

These dolls are meant to be quite long-limbed and quite floppy.  I think they are more of a suggestion of a child than a real depiction of one.  Not at ALL like the last doll I made.  Anyone here remember Jasmine?

She was a LOT more complicated.  I am …. doll parts ….

Basically, the dolls are made of five tubes: one tube for the head and body, two for the legs and two for the arms. The head & body is 65 rounds on the 48-stitch machine and the legs are 65 rounds on the 22 stitch machine.  The arms are 28 rounds on the 22 stitch machine.  Sometimes I think more length on the arms would be better but when I have made them longer, 30 or 35 rounds, they look weird.

That yarn is aran weight (equal to worsted in the USA and what the machines like best) and much more beige than the weird grey it seems here.

I gather the top of the head&body tube

Then stuff the head and do a running stitch around to gather again for a neck.  It varies but generally I do between 25 and 30 stitches down from the gather.

I usually do the nose so I don’t lose track of where the face goes while I position the arms and attach the legs! I just build it up with stitches on top of stitches.

The head&body is 48 stitches around and the legs are 22 – that is determined by the machines.  There is some variation in the larger ones (there is a 40 stitch, a couple of 46 stitch ones and this 48) but all the small ones are, I believe, 22 stitches.  To attach the legs in the easiest way possible, I load 11 stitches from each leg tube onto a needle, then load 24 stitches from the front of the body onto another.

I do  a 3-needle bind-off to join those with a neat edge.  I decrease away the extra stitches from the body side by doing one from the leg and two from the body on the last stitch of the first leg and the first stitch of the second

This gives me a nice neat join. Make sure you put a locking stitch marker on the last stitch from your bind off, as you will load that back on the needle when you do the back half join to the back of the legs!

I stuff a little bit of toy stuffing in the bottom of each leg and gather them about 8-10 stitches up, to make a bit of a foot. The SUGGESTION of a foot anyway. Stuffing first means you don’t have to push the stuffing all the way down that long leg.

I load the leftover stitches on to the needles the same, 22 from each leg, 24 from the back of the body.

and slip on that last held stitch where I will start the 3-needle bind-off

This is the tricky part.  Now you have to stuff the legs and the body, pretty full.

It is impossible to get right-sides-together to do the same sort of 3-needle bind-off so I simply do it as you see it.  There is usually a gap where the extra stitches from the body are and that allows you to stuff it a bit more if need be.  The join looks fine for this doll’s purpose.

The arms are made by gathering each end of the arms and folding the tubes lengthwise.  I do a mattress stitch along the edges and stuff the tube lightly.

Sew the arms on and done.  I made this doll in about three hours.  With that kind of speed I can make many more dolls and hopefully help many more people.

I tend to dress them in whatever I have doll-clothes wise or what I can get in the charity shop from the baby clothes section.  3-6 month sizes work best.  I always do a simple face, just half-circle eyes and a half-circle mouth.  Like I said, they only need to be the suggestion of a child. I am experimenting with hair, trying to balance looks against speed.

Well, that is what I have been doing. Oh and I am finally knitting a summer top with some yarn I bought when Jack was a baby, from John Lewis in London.  It came back to me with our shipment of house stuff that had been stored back in the States for decades.  I guess maybe that is why I don’t blog much – my followers really aren’t knitters, primarily, so I feel they might be a bit bored.  If you made it all the way to the end, well done you.

Maybe I’ll be back sooner than my once every month or so schedule.


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My Nearly No-Sew knitted stuffed heart pattern. Again

OK, for some reason people seem to not notice the link and the bottom so I am going to re-paste it here at the top to make it easier!

blogdivider

Here is the new pattern.  Hope you enjoy it!

blogdivider

I have been tweaking this pattern since I first posted it some two years ago.  I think I am happy with a couple of improvements so I am adding it again.

The biggest improvement is a little hack for making smooth KFB.  I have seen it a few times in various places – I think it is abbreviated as KFSB, or Knit Front, Slip Back.

Basically, you knit the front of the stitch then twist and insert your yarn as if you will knit into the back loop

Instead of knitting, you simply slip that loop over to the right needle.

You have still made another “stitch” (see the three loops where once there were two?) but it looks so much better and it is just a bit faster! The resulting increase is also a bit smoother that the usual KFB.

The harsh straight bars that you get with a KFB (and you can see a little trio of them in the smaller heart-tip) are instead a more gentle, angled bar.

I have taught this heart to a few people, and one aspect that occasionally give people trouble is working on the two “heart bumps” so I thought I would redo the photos for that and practice with my new phone’s camera.

Once you have completed the increases and are ready to do the heart bumps:

Knit the first 10 stitches on the front needle. Slip the last 10 stitches onto some scrap yarn – in this case scrap yarn is a better choice than a stitch marker!

It is a lot less likely to get in your way, because now you will knit only the 20 stitches on the right, 10 on the front needle and 10 on the back.

Once you knit to the end of the heart bump section, cut a long tail and thread a big-eye needle. Run the end thru the live stitches but DO NOT GATHER.

This is where you will stuff.

Now, thread the new yarn end onto your needle and (here comes the sewing bit) make a stitch or two to close the gap in the V of the heart.

Secure this so when you begin knitting it doesn’t loosen up. Now, working on the final 20 stitches, knit a round then repeat the instructions for the original heart bump.  If you are struggling to keep the final few stitches from gathering, slip a fat marker into the opening.

Stuff the heart and gently gather the two tops.

Either secure and weave in the ends OR thread each one thru your needle, insert and exit thru the centre V to create a hanger.

I’ve been stuffing them with lavender from our garden!  Did you know lavender repels the clothes moth?  I have spent too much time knitting socks only to sacrifice them to a hungry moth!

Here is the new pattern.  Hope you enjoy it!

 


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Trauma Teddy, Bobby Buddy, whatever.

{sigh} I have been fighting with the WordPress editor all morning.  I made a post but when I viewed it there were too many weird things happening (like 20 tin, near invisible lines at the end, and text that just kept getting smaller and smaller till at the bottom it was almost unreadable.I kept editing it and in the end I just gave up and deleted it.

I have no idea what was triggering it but I am not going to do it all over again and have it be more of the same.  So here is my PDF.

I did try to make a schematic/visual image of it, kinda like to Trauma Teddy image that is all over the internet, without much luck!

The original is pretty streamlined.  MINE is a bit chaotic, LOL!

My pattern is based (size-wise and stitch count) on the one available for the Dorset Police Bobby Buddies program – Get their pattern here

I wanted a minimal sewing version with no attached pieces. Almost got it! The radio will need to be stitched on for the Dorset Bobby Buddies. 
So long as there are NO BUTTONS or BEADS, this is suitable for that program and should also work for ANY trauma teddy scheme, if the size works.

I WILL add the photos of how to fold the unstuffed bear to match the right sides together and do the SECOND 3-needle bind off.  It;s the only bit that is even remotely tricky.

Once you have done the first 3-needle bind off

You need to fold the head over on to the body

Then fold the legs over on to the head

Then finally fold the upper body (yellow)over the legs – it’s hard to see because of the black, but the right side of the upper body and the right side of the lower body should be matched up for the second 3-needle bind off.

There are links within the PDF for tutorials or videos for some of the less common methods, like the Turkish cast on.

I’ve already sent off a bag of these and have more on the needles.  If you are in the UK, especially if you are in Dorset, feel free to join in the program.

And sorry to subscribers who got a link that disappeared.  Honestly, that post was a MESS. You didn’t miss anything! 🙂