scrappystickyinkymess

Experimenting with editable calendars, by request

9 Comments

Note:  Clearly I was in a too much of a rush yesterday – the links to the PDFs are now included! I also replaced the start-days PDF with one that includes both a Sun to Sat block and and Mon to Sun block for the 2020 leap year February!

I had a request from Kelly, who liked my Inky Circles calendar.  She asked about an editable version.  I have mentioned in the past ways that you can edit the PDFs I make using Photoshop (although Photoshop has changed since 2015 when I did that post, so some things might be slightly different now)  but I wondered if there was a way to make a low-tech version.

Let me go thru the PS/PSE version first:

Here are the files so you can see what I am talking about:

There is a 6 page PDF that has 12 empty circles on a square that fits the CD frame

There is a PDF with the different start days, in 31, 30 and 28 day blocks, with a 29 day one for 2020. Remember, the thing about calendars?  There are only 7 options for start days, and the same blocks work for a Sunday start or a Monday start, depending on the day strip you choose.  Usually I make the 7 blocks all with 31 days, then edit out the days I don’t need on any given year when creating the PDFs.  I thought this would be easier for you and I had the space to fill on the sheet {wink}

editablemonthblocks

There is a PDF with the Month names (in Black and in the colours that match the inky circles) and the years (font is Bonveno CF if it helps) as well as strips that start on a Sunday and ones that start on a Monday.

To edit, you need to open all three PDFs as well as a calendar for the year you want to create for. Nothing is locked and I other than to day blocks, nothing is grouped so it SHOULD be easy to edit.

Methodically copy and paste the Month name, the strip of days, the block of days that matches the start day and number of days for the year you want, and the year number onto the blank inky circle.  Do the same for the 2nd inky circle on that page, save as a PDF, then print.

You can instead type the Month name and the date if you want.

For the Low Tech version, you can look at the calendar for the year you want.  Identify the day blocks that match the 12 months of that year and print enough of the sheet so you have what you need.  Cut out the month blocks, the day strips, the Month name and the year, and glue them to the printed inky circles sheet.

Even easier? Print the inky circles, grab any right-sized little calendar and cut out and stick a month to the sheet.  Or print out a calendar and use the month blocks to do a cut&paste – I already have some 2018 and 19 samples up.  I don’t have time to check them now (off to the Dr in a bit) but I think some of the  one sheet and/or 3 x 4 cards will have month blocks that fit.  Ink the edges and it will look like you meant it to be that way! You can punch them with a circle punch or a die and use that too! You can resize a PDF just within your printer options (like print two pages on one to make things smaller, and that works with any PDF, not just mine) to make it fit. Check out the Tear-Off versions.

And LOL!

Your 2017 calendar is reusable in: 2023

So you can just change the year! 2018 will take till 2029 before it is reusable.

No mater how you slice it, it is all pretty tedious.  I know – I’ve been making calendars for years and it can be mind-numbing.  But fun too.  So there yo go.  Feeling adventurous?  Have a play and report back.  I don’t know what other programs might allow you to edit – Adobe Acrobat and Inkscape come to mind, and I love Intaglio, despite it’s bugs.  I’ll have a go with the version of PSE I have (10 and 14, I think, for Mac) when I get back and report back.

 

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9 thoughts on “Experimenting with editable calendars, by request

  1. Thank goodness for Maryanne!

  2. You are a treasure! I read your blog regularly and post it often. Today, I read it as ‘edible’ not ‘editable’ and laughed out loud when I realized you had not created food for thought. LOL Had to write and tell you how much I enjoy your hard work and appreciate what you do for total strangers – thank you ever so much.

  3. My goodness…I do well to just start up my PC .

  4. I really like this idea. You are a genius. Love your work.

  5. Thank you for the extra time you put into a wonderful presentation. I like this set up a lot.

    Happy thoughts,
    Petrina
    New York

  6. Would you send this again please.  I could not find the links to the PDF documents.  They would not open either when I clicked on the pictures.  I would like to try this out.  Thanks.  I also went to the website and could not find the links to the PDF either. Ronna Crowley

  7. Thank you!!!!!! 🙂

  8. Thank you for all sharing ! You are a genius. Love your work.
    Nicky from France

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