scrappystickyinkymess

Hungarian Map Fold Book

7 Comments

So the bookmaking group I am on (pretty darn nearly the only thing that ever drives me to log in to Facebook) had a challenge for a Turkish Map Fold book.  You may recall I reposted quite an old PDF of instructions that had disappeared from the net. I’ve always like this fold, and had a bit of a play with it.  The book was cute enough, but I had to make another one so I could improve the construction.  As this is going to be VERY photo intense I’ll just show you the bare bones – a three-folds pamphlet with a flap.

TMP

The Turkish map folds are stuck two together and then stuck between each section. I’ll do another post about the construction but today I want to explain the HUNGARIAN map fold, a variation on this one, and my circular variation on that.

There is a great post here with the basic fold. That is for a square piece.  And don’t be fooled by the video that may pop up – it’s for the Turkish fold, not the Hungarian one. Although to be fair it is only one additional diagonal that differentiates the two, and by sticking the units so one piece is flat, mine really ends up being more Turkish than Hungarian LOL! But orienting the text is easier with the additional diagonal, I think.

Let me show you the finished  book first.  4hungarianmapfold

I would say e.e. cummings is my favourite poet and this one of my favourite poems. This is what the it looks like opened.

hungarianmapfold

but without the inserts. Unlike the Turkish one from yesterday, this one has only ONE insert between each section. The inserts are heavier weight than the graph paper so two would have made the book VERY thick.

2hungarianmapfold

I’ll be showing you folding specifically for the placement of the text as well as folding a “diagonal” on a circle the only thing you need to know that the original linked page doesn’t cover.

1. I printed the text across the middle of pink graph paper.  

circlehungarianmapfold

Fold the circle in half bottom to top, across the text.  Use the lines of text to make sure the fold is straight across

2circlehungarianmapfold

2. Open and fold, again with the text on the outside, in half side to side.  

3circlehungarianmapfold

Flip it over.  It should look like this:

4circlehungarianmapfold

3. Fold the diagonals by matching the fold lines.  This is the only tricky fold.

5circlehungarianmapfold

4. Fold the second diagonal by matching the top and bottom fold lines of the first diagonal

6circlehungarianmapfold

5. Collapse the piece.  It should want to collapse, if you’ve done the folds right.

7circlehungarianmapfold

Note the orientation of the text.  You want the flat area to be the text area. Once collapsed it will look like this:

8circlehungarianmapfold

6. Mark each unit at the same point – can you see the tiny dots?

9circlehungarianmapfold

then fold in the side to meet the point.

10circlehungarianmapfold

7. This sounds tricky but it isn’t.  REVERSE the folds so those triangle on the top switch to being INSIDE the unit.  Open them

11circlehungarianmapfold

and push on that middle fold to push it inward

12circlehungarianmapfold

Re-crease the folds.  It will change from the left image to the right one.

13circlehungarianmapfold

And THAT is the circular Hungarian Map Fold. These inserts are just smaller units than the cardstock ones and the fit inside perfectly.  I didn’t go to any extraordinary lengths to get the units in exact proportion, I just made sure the marking and fold-in sides were similar, and that was good enough for them to nest nicely. I did stick them only in the very centre, which I think would help accommodate slight variations

2nested

3nested

and yet they collapse fine.

nested

 

I experimented with a number of circle sizes and they all seem to nest nicely.

It would make a nice card too, just one fold.

I think it’s just a pretty little book.  I also think the flat areas that hold the text could easily hold photos and you could add journaling or other text to the smaller folded areas by the print/cut/stick method, or hand write it if yo prefer the circles open up relatively flat.  Well, dang.  Now I have to make  a photo one too.  Argh.  Maybe I’ll photo that for a step-by step for the construction…

{sigh}

And I can do the straight Turkish fold on a circle and see if it really is the same (minus the extra diagonal) and if it matters.

Jeez.  I am so out of practice for these tutorial sorts of posts.  I’ll try to be more concise for the next one,  just need to get my groove back.

And finish those last few ATCs before Wednesday!

 

 

 

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7 thoughts on “Hungarian Map Fold Book

  1. Thanks for the tutorial it sure does look fantastic from here and complicated. Although I did read the instructions gosh the patience you must have to do this tutorial.

    Thanks & hugs
    Eliza & Yoda

  2. Wonferful tutorial. Thanks. 👍👍 😊

  3. Wow, love this technique and love the book you made. Definitely want to try this. TFS

  4. You are the best – whenever I want to experiment and have no time at hand I look up and there you are with great photos and instructions – the Bookmaking group is lucky to have you in their group. I’m headed out for a four day RV adventure with whole west coast family but am going to sneak a few tools and supplies in my bag like some circles!

  5. I love anything to do with handmade books, especially folded ones! I am going to have to find time to come back and look more carefully at your instructions 🙂

  6. Pingback: Printables, and a near-fail book | scrappystickyinkymess

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