scrappystickyinkymess

Emulsion paint?

3 Comments

So as I have been wandering the wallpaper aisles lately, snatching up wallpaper samples for Gelli printing, I keep seeing (and being tempted by the colours) little tester pots of Emulsion paint (for walls.) I almost bought a couple of pots a week or so back, but as I wanted to use it on my Gelli plate, I felt like I should do a little research first.  This page (and the live page seems to just crank away without loading, but the cached page is here) answered my questions, that basically there is very little difference in wall paint and “craft” acrylic paint except, perhaps, the % of acrylic resin to other cheaper alternatives.  And what I knew it as in the States, LATEX paint, is a bit of a misnomer, because there is no actual LATEX (a natural product from the rubber tree plant) in so-called latex paint. What is in it is a synthetic polymer that has the same properties but a different chemical make-up.

I dug around a bit more, and from what I can see that is echoed other places. One difference is  perhaps the pigmentation (how colour-rich it is) and the “body” of it.  Wall paint is pretty much never going to stand up like a blob of acrylic paint from a tube! and to me wall paint smells more/worse/different.  On the flip side, these tester pots of pretty, pretty colours, were 80p per 75 ml pot.  That is a lot of paint for 80p!  and the “Value Paint” I recently got, because of the colours, was double the price and so thin an anaemic looking it was a waste of money. The prints from these look MUCH better, in intensity of colour.

emulsion

It seems to work pretty much as I expected.  I could brayer it on, stamp over a texture with another colour and pull a print (leaving a totally clean plate) – although getting the paint on was harder as it comes in a big, wide-mouthed pot not a squeeze bottle.

2emulsion

 

3emulsion

 

I could print over it with a mask

4emulsion

and use a stencil both with it and on it

5emulsion

 

and I could stamp on it with Archival ink and it did not smear.

6emulsion

 

Not the best piece I ever made but it was more about testing the methods I tend to use with the paint pots than making a perfect print.

Now, I am not ready to give up my proper acrylics, but if I wanted a particular colour and couldn’t find it, or was drawn to a particular shade, I would use emulsion, without questions.  If I were proper arty and I wanted to make a piece to hang on my wall, I might use some of the same paint on the piece so it matched.

Now, I really need to tidy things up a bit so I can finish a gift item  – I am making a little book that I want to evoke the cover of the source of the poem for someone who loves it like I do:

2Gbook

 

I am using Gelli prints and using the turtle wrap but altering it a little. I am liking it so far but still a way to go.  I dragged out, for the first time in EONS, some Ma Vinci stamps.  I was sad to hear she is selling up and closing down, I love her stamps and have a few alphabets that need to see the light of day a bit more.  This one was a firm fave but I had sort of forgotten all about it.

Gbook

 

I think I need to drag out a few more of them and have a look at them again. . .

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3 thoughts on “Emulsion paint?

  1. I love the way you are always trying new things! And I believe that Mark Rothko used wall paint if I am not mistaken. So it is all in the hands of an artist…..

  2. Thanks for all the research & experimenting you do and write about. It is very helpful (if I ever actually get my gellli out & do something with it!). It’s good to know about the wall paint. I’ll be checking into trying this one day. TFS.

  3. Maybe you could try adding some gel or matte medium with a palette knife to the plate and mixing it in with the paint to give it more body and permanence

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