scrappystickyinkymess


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Martha’s Corner punches – making circles frames

Well.  I had a bit of a binge the other night on QVC’s Craft Day.  There were a few things on sale and I thought What the heck? Yes, I know I could probably have gotten them from another shop cheaper but it was late, I was watching the demos, and I just had all kinds of ideas that I was itching to test out.

I was looking at the one lacy corner and the design reminded me of handkerchief lace. Or the little shelf edgings that were once popular. The nice thing about the MS punches is that the corner guides fold away so you can use them or not.  And for what I had in mind I did NOT.

Just by ignoring the guides and punching along the straight edge of the paper, you get this adorable edge.  and if you cut your strip to 1 inch (which is the width of the pattern, you can make a bunch of stuff.  Each end of the strip and you get a banner:

It would look cute on a card with the sentiment stamped in it, or to add journaling to a layout.  If you trim off on side – or only punch one side – you get a sort of tag:

Again, great for a sentiment or small journaling bits. But if you fold it over ribbon or twine, you get a sort-of bunting :

Not the traditional triangles, but still cute, I think.

But the most fun was when I thought could I punch around something? You betcha!

I first tried to do it using a technique I have seen a lot, of matching up areas of the punch and going around a square page, but that really didn’t work.  I kept ending up with double punched bits.  So I got mathematical about it.  I started with the 4″ circle from the Nesties Standard Circle Large.  I divided that into quarters.

This is the BACK – and I would use a fine pencil line, but I wanted you to see the idea.  I punched the corner, no guide, at each of the four lines. The lines act as a guide for placement to centre the motif along the line, AND the top of the punch along the centre divide keeps it level.  Each punch is slightly different, some were right up to the line in the large circle.  Punching from the back makes sure that the placement is right but also that the neater punched side is the front of the finished piece.  The edges from the back of the punch always look a little raggedy to me.

Once I had all four of those punched, I simply connected them by punching another motif between.

On some of the patterns I drew a connecting line between the punched motifs, just to help me place them, but especially using the Standard Circles Small largest die, I found the edges of the motifs DID match up.

The left is Standard Circles Small and the right is SC Large.  You can just see the slight variation in the triangle between the motifs.

I think this gives you enough of an idea to have a go, but I will do a few more, make some notes, take a few more photos and get it in shape for a YouTube slide show.I really like how they turned out and think that the concept might work well for other corner punches.  You might need to experiment with circle size, but for the corners on point to cut a straight border, just punch away.

Off to roast a chicken.  Not NEARLY as much fun….